Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Dec 2010 22:54 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Yet another possible change in Ubuntu's core components: they're mulling over replacing GDM with LightDM. Why? Well: "Faster - the greeter doesn't require an entire GNOME session to run. More flexible - multiple greeters are supported through a well defined interface. This allows Ubuntu derivatives to use the same display manager (e.g. Kubuntu, Lubuntu etc.). Simpler codebase - similar feature set in ~5000 lines of code compared to 50000 in GDM. Supports more usecases - first class support for XDMCP and multihead."
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nice
by backdoc on Sat 11th Dec 2010 00:55 UTC
backdoc
Member since:
2006-01-14

I love the direction Ubuntu seems to be going. Thinking outside the box...

I'm can't wait to play with these future releases.

Reply Score: 6

RE: nice
by cmost on Sat 11th Dec 2010 02:00 in reply to "nice"
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

Thinking outside the box...as in off your Linux box entirely. Many of the changes proposed for Ubuntu are poorly conceived and not very well executed. Unity, for example will take three or four (or five) releases before it's usable or as feature complete as Gnome 3 (though I'm no fan of the Gnome Shell either.) The same situation exists with Wayland, which is nowhere near prime time at the moment; from what I read on LightDM's home page it's exactly the same boat. All of these radical changes will no doubt bring regressions and frustration to Ubuntu's user base, which are comprised of fresh Linux converts and newbies. Given Ubuntu's arguably poor track record with regards to bug fixing, many of these regressions may persist across several generations of Ubuntu. What a great way to convince newcomers to Linux how "superior" and stable it is as an operating system. Meanwhile, more conservative Linux distros like Mepis, PCLinuxOS and the like, which offer great, rock solid Linux experiences for novices and experts alike will remain obscure because their innovations are eclipsed by the tech darling Ubuntu. I think it's great that Ubuntu is thinking of new and interesting directions in which to take Ubuntu, but a slow and steady approach that ensures things are done right is best. Not a fast and loose barrage of half-implemented changes that confuse and confound users.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: nice
by backdoc on Sat 11th Dec 2010 02:34 in reply to "RE: nice"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

but a slow and steady approach that ensures things are done right is best. Not a fast and loose barrage of half-implemented changes that confuse and confound users.


You are assuming stable releases won't be stable. I think that's a big assumption. And, if stability is your main objective, just use debian proper or one of the other distros you mentioned.

I think you mght be over reacting.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: nice
by backdoc on Sat 11th Dec 2010 03:19 in reply to "RE: nice"
backdoc Member since:
2006-01-14

...Many of the changes proposed for Ubuntu are poorly conceived and not very well executed....


How can proposed changes not be well executed? They are "proposed".

If you look at Android, it's linux without X. OSX is BSD Unix, without X. This is the same direction Ubuntu is taking. Why did others dump X, because they don't need it for their audience. I'm not against X. I want X to stay on my box. But, I want it on Ubuntu the same way it is on my MBP, not required for basic window and mouse functionality.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: nice
by stabbyjones on Sat 11th Dec 2010 04:14 in reply to "RE: nice"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

Ubuntu = New and 'crazy' things on top of a snapshot of Debian which means they can be implemented quicker and easier than changing Debian itself.

Debian = Test, Freeze, Release. which seems to take about 2yrs a release at the moment.

I like the Debian approach better which is why I don't use Ubuntu. You should probably do the same if it causes you this much stress.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: nice
by fran on Sat 11th Dec 2010 10:05 in reply to "RE: nice"
fran Member since:
2010-08-06

I just dont know how this could be a bad thing.
Less code that does the same thing is always better.

Although that code is being implemented for the first time in Ubuntu does NOT mean it is new, untested code.

Luckily Ubuntu is not a democracy.

Edited 2010-12-11 10:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: nice
by aaronb on Sat 11th Dec 2010 12:41 in reply to "RE: nice"
aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

Its nice to see that the Linux distributions are not stuck in a rut and are actually willing to try something new.

Yes we all remember how pulseadio on Ubuntu was not a shining example of how to implement something at first, but standing still is a great way to become obsolete.

Never crashing or being more stable than Windows just does not cut it any more.

I guess what makes Ubuntu more palatable to new users is that it simple to install and set-up, installing graphic card drivers and installing media codecs is not difficult. And although it almost pains me to say this, I have found it quite easy to teach people how to use tools like the "Software Centre".

The above coupled with installing Wine 1.2.1 seems to make it an acceptable distribution for a lot of people who just use it to do simple tasks and play the odd game.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: nice
by JAlexoid on Mon 13th Dec 2010 11:13 in reply to "RE: nice"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Unity, for example will take three or four (or five) releases before it's usable or as feature complete as Gnome 3 (though I'm no fan of the Gnome Shell either.)

Aren't they doing exactly what you complaining about? Unity and Wayland will not be the default combination for quite a while.

Reply Parent Score: 2