Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 14th Dec 2010 23:55 UTC, submitted by Oliver
OpenBSD Okay, this is potentially very big news that really needs all the exposure it can get. OpenBSD's Theo de Raadt has received an email in which it was revealed to him that ten years ago, the FBI paid several open source developers to implement hidden backdoors in OpenBSD's IPSEC stack. De Raadt decided to publish the email for all to see, so that the code in question can be reviewed. Insane stuff.
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Valhalla
Member since:
2006-01-24

a bug is when someone makes a mistake in code. a "well-designed door" is a full feature. If you can't catch the get_pwnd_by_fbi() function, then you sure as hell aren't going to catch a bug.


A bug is not purposely hidden, a backdoor is. But you are obviously just trolling what with the 'get_pwnd_by_fbi()'.

Reply Parent Score: 2

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

And you obviously don't know what you are talking about if you think that code with a logic issue is easier to detect then code that does something completely different then it should.

Reply Parent Score: 3

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

"On two concert I'm should collective photo, but such small, fat, bald-headed technologist be insane".

I'm not going to reply to something vague and nonsensical with anything but the same.

Reply Parent Score: 1

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Checked your website to see what your first language is.

It seems to be English, and you normally write it well.

As such, I see this as obfuscation of any possible point.

That, combined with an anti-scientology post (I'm no fan of scientology, just to be clear) and it's fairly clear you know the Rules of the Internet, and probably don't talk about /b/ or talk about /b/. (not a typo, to anyone who hasn't read that list of insane rules)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

And you obviously don't know what you are talking about if you think that code with a logic issue is easier to detect then code that does something completely different then it should.

Seriously, how long have you been programming and at what level? I programmed professionally for 8+ years (assembly, c, c++, perl, python). You can hide malicious code in logic issues aswell as using other techniques. For some examples (that I think you should be able to follow):

http://underhanded.xcott.com/?page_id=17

And this was in the crypto framework, which is quite advanced stuff and the mail mentioned key-leaking mechanisms. And no, it's not going to be any function call in the middle of the code called 'leak_keys()', I thought you were just trolling but it seems you are most likely very incompetent.

Edited 2010-12-15 15:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

And you obviously don't know what you are talking about if you think that code with a logic issue is easier to detect then code that does something completely different then it should.


If you were to put a backdoor in some program you wouldn't insert a "backdoor code", which could be easily spotted, but place a concealed bug that you can exploit later. A bug inside a piece of code that other than that does exactly what it's supposed to do.

As such, in the event it was found, it would be indistinguishable from any other bug, and because it's deliberately concealed it'd be harder to find.

Which leads to believe that maybe, just maybe, someone could actually have fixed that backdoor already (if it's true that it was placed to begin with). If some dev had found it he wouldn't have gone "OMG A BACKDOOR!!!" but just fix it the same as with any other bug.

Reply Parent Score: 3