Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Dec 2010 22:56 UTC, submitted by fran
Windows Very light on details, but this is interesting nonetheless - very interesting, and potentially one of the biggest things to have hit the operating systems business this decade. Bloomberg is reporting that Microsoft plans to announce Windows for ARM processors at CES in January 2011.
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Two years away?
by cranfordio on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 06:10 UTC
cranfordio
Member since:
2005-11-10

The Wall Street Journal also has an article about this and their article says it is two years away from release. I don't know if that was a mistake but if it's true then I think it will be way too late. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704851204576034051605...

Reply Score: 1

RE: Two years away?
by lemur2 on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 12:08 in reply to "Two years away?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

The Wall Street Journal also has an article about this and their article says it is two years away from release. I don't know if that was a mistake but if it's true then I think it will be way too late. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704851204576034051605...


If Windows on ARM is due for release two years away, then IMO it is not targetted at the mobile space at all ... it is targetted at the server space.

The ARM Cortex-A15 MPcore component is also a couple of years away, and that component is also targetted at desktops and servers.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/09/09/arm-reveals-eagle-core-as-cortex...

Cortex-A15 MPcore will be capable of quad-core computing at up to 2.5GHz, at much lower power consumption levels than comparable x86/x86_64 chipsets today. Server machines, which are on all the time, will be designed with one or two or even more of the ARM Cortex-A15 MPcore CPUs. Linux as it is today will run like a dream on these machines of the near future. If Windows cannot run on such machines, Microsoft will virtually hand the server market over to Linux.

PS: Linux servers today can run Samba 4, Alfresco, CUPS and OpenChange.
http://www.alfresco.com/
http://www.cups.org/documentation.php/network.html
http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/273515/active_directory_com...
http://www.openchange.org/index.php/home/what-is-openchange

So, IMO, Windows-on-ARM is actually targetted at the low-power high-performance quad core Cortex-A15 MPcore based servers that will be available on the market in a few years time.

Edited 2010-12-22 12:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Two years away?
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 12:31 in reply to "RE: Two years away?"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

So, IMO, Windows-on-ARM is actually targetted at the low-power high-performance quad core Cortex-A15 MPcore based servers that will be available on the market in a few years time.


Yes, that makes a hell of a lot more sense to me as well (I'll write a new article on this today, with the WSJ article and your comment as sources). I mean, I'm sure Microsoft plans to move WP7 to the tablet space, while keeping NT for desktops/laptops/servers. Since a Microsoft server usually consists of Microsoft software (which MS can compile for ARM itself) combined with open source software (which is usually available for ARM already), the application situation wouldn't apply.

Reply Parent Score: 2