Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Dec 2010 22:56 UTC, submitted by fran
Windows Very light on details, but this is interesting nonetheless - very interesting, and potentially one of the biggest things to have hit the operating systems business this decade. Bloomberg is reporting that Microsoft plans to announce Windows for ARM processors at CES in January 2011.
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RE[7]: what's the point?
by Nelson on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 13:48 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: what's the point?"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Most WP7 apps are not written in Silverlight. XNA and XAML are not Silverlight.

Almost all of them do.
The exception being OEM apps which use Silverlight and native code interop to do their thing.

Of the 4,500 apps, 99% of them use either pure Silverlight or pure XNA which is also .NET.


So of course Windows Phone 7 is going to have more apps sooner than Android. Android started off with basically a complete blank slate with a highly altered API not compadible with normal Java applications.


So? You can't dismiss a competitor advantage because its an advantage ..


Now XNA and XAML. XNA was designed for games. Was not designed with the idea of being power effective.


Yes it was. The .NET Compact Framework was designed to be power effective , which XNA builds on.


XAML is about as messy as the Android graphical solution. So in my eye Silverlight is dead MS does not want to own upto it so is trying to relabel XNA and XAML as it.


Stop making shit up. None of this is true. You're throwing a bunch of acronyms and words together into an incoherent thicket of bullshit. Don't do this.


Yes WP7 phone is equally power effective as an android device until it starts having to run multi apps. Its also the reason why android has apps to measure the power effectiveness of applications so users can choose better power designed applications. Ie android better coded applications are more powereffective. WP7 all your apps are basically the same crap level of power effectiveness that lines up near the bottom edge of android apps.


Again, you make absolutely no sense. Your lack of understanding, which is probably willful ignorance is egregious. Please, please, research what you speak about.

As a Silverlight dev, I can write a faster, prettier , more functional app in less than half the time it takes anyone else on any platform.

WP7 is .NET nirvana. It has an army of devs behind it. MSFT has the most vibrant dev ecosystem on the planet with .NET, and at this rate, we will outpace the other platforms faster than Android did iOS

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: what's the point?
by TheGZeus on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 14:33 in reply to "RE[7]: what's the point?"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19


As a Silverlight dev, I can write a faster, prettier , more functional app in less than half the time it takes anyone else on any platform.

...because you're familiar with it and it has a complete graphics library.
A Java dev might say the same thing.
For a custom server-side application, a CL dev might say the same thing...

If you're familiar with the platform, and it's got the needed libraries, you can work faster on that platform than any other.
That's just... basic logic.

For art, I know clay and glazes the best, so I can work fastest with those tools.
No tool is the best tool, the best tool for the job varies from job-to-job, person-to-person.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[9]: what's the point?
by Nelson on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 22:23 in reply to "RE[8]: what's the point?"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Absolutely right, to an extent, familiarity helps, but especially with Java you're going to run into some limits as to what you can do with the platform. There's really not a presentation platform on Android anywhere near as rich as Silverlight, and this is coming from someone who desperately wishes there was.

Don't get me wrong, Android is very nice and the platform is very well thought out, but it's just not the same.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: what's the point?
by MysterMask on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 21:36 in reply to "RE[7]: what's the point?"
MysterMask Member since:
2005-07-12

You do realize that you sound pretty desperate, don't you?

People with a time / technology horizon that goes beyond the walled landscape of MS will not care much about stellar productivity promises: they have never materialize and neither WP7 nor Silverlight is any different.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: what's the point?
by Nelson on Wed 22nd Dec 2010 22:21 in reply to "RE[8]: what's the point?"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


People with a time / technology horizon that goes beyond the walled landscape of MS will not care much about stellar productivity promises: they have never materialize and neither WP7 nor Silverlight is any different.


Really? We went from drawing board to app store in less than a month and are getting some decent returns out of an ad supported application. You cant tell me that there are no productivity gains in developers being able to use familiar languages and frameworks with competent design and development tools.

I'll be waiting in the real world when you decide to join it.

In fact, we achieved a pretty decent amount of code sharing from our desktop solution due to the common language and framework. Basically all of our backend model and binding/validation logic was reused, we only wrote a new UI to accomondate the smaller display and look and feel of WP7.

You can doubt, you can deny, but my checks sure seem to materialize in my bank account.

Reply Parent Score: 2