Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Jan 2011 22:21 UTC, submitted by Kroc
Google The WebM project - a VP8 video stream and a Vorbis audio stream wrapped in a Matroska container re-branded as a WebM container - launched by Google, openly supported by every major chip maker, is going to be the major codec for Google's Chrome web browser. Yes, Google is dropping H264 support from the Chrome web browser.
Thread beginning with comment 457108
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
galvanash
Member since:
2006-01-25

It is really frustrating reading some of the responses in this thread and all over the internet to this news...

Do people not realize that Google has to pay to incorporate h.264 into Chrome? This is a product that they give away for free. Why do you think they bought On2 in the first place? How anyone can be remotely surprised by this is beyond me - this was obviously the plan since day one when they announced webm.

This has absolutely nothing to do with open source, morality, doing the right thing, vindictiveness, conquering the internet, propping up Adobe, or any of the other stupid conspiracy theories people using to explain this... Its about money (promoting an actual open standard is simply a nice bonus for the rest of us). Google is simply protecting itself from the inevitable - which is being bent over and screwed by MPEG-LA.

MPEG-LA has the entire technology world by the balls, and everyone wants to pretend it aint so. The royalty free licensing that they have promised to offer in perpetuity (assuming they keep that promise) doesn't do anything for the Googles of the world - they still have to pay to implement support in their products. And pay, and pay, and pay...

Here is the real, unadulterated truth about the whole situation: MPEG-LA has a licensing model which generates revenue by having companies carry the burden for their end users. It is the users that benefit from the product, not the companies who use the technology.

There is nothing unusual about with this, many commercial products are licensed in similar ways. However, if you are a company that gives away your product - how the hell are you supposed to justify paying for such a license when there is a perfectly good alternative that doesn't cost you money? Math is an awfully powerful motivator when it comes to financial reality...

I say this to all the people whining about Google "screwing the internet", how about you pay for the use of h.264? It is you that benefits from it anyway, not Google... Go negotiate your own license which allows you to encode all your videos in h.264 so that you can get your oh so precious 20% better quality or whatever, instead of screaming about it. Google is simply not interested in carrying your financial burden anymore - stop freeloading and pay up people.

Any takers?

Edited 2011-01-12 00:37 UTC

Reply Score: 13

Oliver Member since:
2006-07-15

Some people call this behaviour of yours "Stockholm-Syndrom". But apart from that, Google doesn't spread presents! You pay with your very data and they get whatever they want from the Open Source community.

Webkit == Apples fork of KHTML (KDE/Konqueror)

The community made it possible to use Chrome on Linux or even 64bit. The first Chrome wasn't 64bit clean, also a community effort.

So please stop this "be quiet, they give us presents"-nonsense, it's just nonsense.

Reply Parent Score: 1

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Damn! I was sure that my carefully constructed argument was foolproof, but you managed to rip it to shreds with your "Google Isn't Santa Claus" response. I guess that'll teach me...

Reply Parent Score: 4

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Some people call this behaviour of yours "Stockholm-Syndrom". But apart from that, Google doesn't spread presents! You pay with your very data and they get whatever they want from the Open Source community.

Wow. I wasn't aware that we'd been kidknapped by Google.

So please stop this "be quiet, they give us presents"-nonsense, it's just nonsense.

Nobody is saying that I'm afraid. People are happy that Google has done at least one thing right that will benefit the web and help software and hardware developers.

Reply Parent Score: 3