Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 26th Jan 2011 22:24 UTC, submitted by fran
Linux Installing software on Linux has gotten progressively easier over the years, down to being downright foolproof in Ubuntu's Application Center. However, there is still the problem of each distribution relying on its own frontends and backends, and this needs to be addressed. Members from all the major Linux distributions have held several talks, and have come up with a solution which is already being implemented.
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RE: attendees
by OSbunny on Thu 27th Jan 2011 06:41 UTC in reply to "attendees"
OSbunny
Member since:
2009-05-23

Exactly! This is very good to see. I want to see more such collaboration between the major vendors. We already have them sharing technologies like RPM and apt-get. So why not develop applications that are common to all distributions?

A unified app store might even mean a unified app repository. Imagine that! These are huge distros we are talking about. You'd never have to compile anything from source. And there would always be latest version of your favourite app available for your distro.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Latest Version of the App available
by shotsman on Thu 27th Jan 2011 07:15 in reply to "RE: attendees"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

And therein lies a problem.
The latest version will probably run on the latest version of Ubuntu but how will that play on a server distro like RHEL where everything is not at the latest cutting and dare I say it slightly unstable edge?
If I'm using a stable server distro (ie one where I just want patched and a few bits backported) I would need to see a range of versions of the app in the store with their OS dependencies so that I can install the one that will run on my Server System.
The last thing I want is to install an app that brings down with it versions of OS libs that don't play with the stuff I already have installed.
The sheer vision of trying to sort that mess out makes me want to steer well clear of this for some time to come.
Just because some crappy dev builds an app that requires the latest version of a lib that will go merrily stomping over your existing stuff is not what I want.
If however the apps were setup to be installed in a way similar to those on OSX where the app deps are kept well away from the system libs then I'd go for it.
There is a lot to sort out here...

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The last thing I want is to install an app that brings down with it versions of OS libs that don't play with the stuff I already have installed.


For userland, desktop-oriented apps, statically compiled binaries or "app bundles" work work so much nicer.

For server-oriented apps, dynamic linking is better and "more secure".

But for an "app store", bundles and/or static linking would be so much simpler, easier, nicer.

If however the apps were setup to be installed in a way similar to those on OSX where the app deps are kept well away from the system libs then I'd go for it.
There is a lot to sort out here...


Ah, see, we're all thinking along the same lines. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: attendees
by wirespot on Thu 27th Jan 2011 14:37 in reply to "RE: attendees"
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

A unified app store might even mean a unified app repository. Imagine that!


I don't think that will ever happen. Different distributions cater to different audiences and purposes. And each distribution has different branches, at the very least a "stable" and a "development" branch; most of them more than two.

The system they're proposing here is a wrapper that hides the different package managers under a common interface with features that appeal to end-users. It's great they're doing this wrapper but it's just a specialized app that caters to a niche audience. Do not expect major architectural changes to go with it.

It does not mean package managers will be unified, ever, or that distributions will give up their own goals and development process just for the sake of dumping everything into one big repository.

Furthermore, power users and developers will need to keep using the power tools of the package manager. They need the extra information, or to automate update and upgrade operations, or to fine-tune the way the manager works, be able to access it from the console etc.

Please remember that Linux is very flexible and is being used by lots of people in lots of different ways. "Grandma's desktop PC" is just a small part of it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: attendees
by phoenix on Thu 27th Jan 2011 17:16 in reply to "RE[2]: attendees"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The system they're proposing here is a wrapper that hides the different package managers under a common interface with features that appeal to end-users.


I haven't read the article yet, but isn't that what PackageKit does? I've use KPackageKit on Kubuntu (apt backend) and Arch (pacman backend) and it works just the way you say: unified front-end that's easy to use, but that queries the distro-specific repos.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: attendees
by avgalen on Fri 28th Jan 2011 06:11 in reply to "RE[2]: attendees"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

I see Linux being used in 3 places:
embedded OS (hardly ever gets updated, so no repository needed, let alone an appstore)
server OS (updates sometimes come from a repository but not always and an appstore is not needed)
"Grandma's Desktop OS" (or more commonly refered to as "Geek OS"/"No virus OS"/"Cheap OS" where this article is all about

Indeed a small part, but the only part relevant here

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: attendees
by mgl.branco on Thu 27th Jan 2011 17:44 in reply to "RE: attendees"
mgl.branco Member since:
2009-07-22

A unified app store might even mean a unified app repository. Imagine that! These are huge distros we are talking about. You'd never have to compile anything from source. And there would always be latest version of your favourite app available for your distro.


Would be great. openSUSE build service goes pretty much in that direction and maybe other companies could join the effort so their devs could concentrate on other areas. Just saying, maybe in real world this doesn't make sense at all LoL.

Reply Parent Score: 1