Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Feb 2011 16:00 UTC, submitted by aa
Multimedia, AV Well, well, well. The MPEG-LA is showing its true colours. After a decade of threatening to patent troll the living heck out of Theora, the company led by a patent troll has now finally put its money where its mouth is. Well, sort of. They don't actually have any patents yet, they're asking people to submit patents they believe are essential to the VP8 specification. Update: MPEG (so not the MPEG-LA) has announced its intent to develop a new video compression standard for the web which will be royalty-free. "The new standard is intended to achieve substantially better compression performance than that offered by MPEG-2 and possibly comparable to that offered by the AVC Baseline Profile. MPEG will issue a call for proposals on video compression technology at the end of its upcoming meeting in March 2011 that is expected to lead to a standard falling under ISO/IEC 'Type-1 licensing', i.e. intended to be 'royalty free'."
Thread beginning with comment 462250
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Sat 12th Feb 2011 08:46 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

The MPEG-LAs licencing is set up so that they could cherry pick just about any individual or organisation and sue them. They are no better than the RIAA who want to extract money every time a song gets played.

At the moment they don’t need to go about litigating, despite a massive number of individuals and organisations not correctly paying their H.264 fees, they are earning enough steady income from television transmissions, cameras / camcorders / DVD & Blu-Ray players and the content industry; it would be expensive and messy to start suing people to try extract a small percentage more.

But everything is moving to the web. It won’t be long before every TV is Internet connected and video capable. And if those TVs support royalty-free WebM—which gives a price advantage to equipment manufacturers—then in 10 years time, the MPEG-LA could see their sweet little taxation on the populous completely dry up.

WebM is the biggest threat that faces them, and they will not go quietly. This is an organisation whose CEO trolls his own customers with patent litigation. Expect litigation against VP8 decoder manufacturers or service broadcasters. It is their only response when things get desperate.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by pafipe on Sat 12th Feb 2011 22:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
pafipe Member since:
2010-03-22

"It won’t be long before every TV is Internet connected and video capable".

Where can I get a "video incapable" TV? I really really want one. Even if its not internet connected.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by daedalus on Mon 14th Feb 2011 08:58 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14


Where can I get a "video incapable" TV? I really really want one. Even if its not internet connected.


I have one, it used to be video capable until someone disabled that feature by pouring beer into it. It's yours for the modest price of €1,499.95.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by westlake on Mon 14th Feb 2011 18:55 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

And if those TVs support royalty-free WebM—which gives a price advantage to equipment manufacturers—then in 10 years time, the MPEG-LA could see their sweet little taxation on the populous completely dry up.


The H.264 licensors include Fujitsu, Hitachi, JVC, LG, Mitsubushi, Panasonic, Philips, Samsung, Sharp, Sony and Toshiba.

H.264 support is baked in to every digital television set sold on this planet.

If you are in the business of supplying hardware for any link in the chain from the studio camera to the tv set, you are licensing H.264.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by TheGZeus on Mon 14th Feb 2011 19:01 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Who keeps a TV for 10 years these days?

That's the point. It could be phased out.

Reply Parent Score: 2