Linked by lemur2 on Tue 22nd Feb 2011 22:37 UTC
Qt A first alpha version of a Qt implementation for the Android mobile operating system has been announced by Romanian software developer Bogdan Vatra. Since Nokia in co-operation with Microsoft have announced that it does not intend to develop a Windows Phone variant of the GUI framework, Qt for Android represents the only remaining route/platfrom to providing mobile phone apps developed using Qt.
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Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29



"Qt uses the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports"
http://qt.nokia.com/products

For example, I've used Qt Creator in Linux and Windows and the controls were the ones from each operating system.


For someone who's "used Qt Creator", you're quite frankly wrong. Qt uses the themeing APIs of the respective platforms to get colors and such correct, but it does not use the native platform widgets.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" "Qt uses the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports" http://qt.nokia.com/products For example, I've used Qt Creator in Linux and Windows and the controls were the ones from each operating system.
For someone who's "used Qt Creator", you're quite frankly wrong. Qt uses the themeing APIs of the respective platforms to get colors and such correct, but it does not use the native platform widgets. "

You are both correct ... It may not use the native platform widgets ... but it does use the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports.

http://qt.nokia.com/products/library/modular-class-library

However, the Qt widgets can be made to conform to native widget appearance via the use of the Qstyle class:
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/qstyle.html
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/qmacstyle.html

and style sheets:
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/stylesheet.html

The QMacStyle class provides a Mac OS X style using the Apple Appearance Manager.

This class is implemented as a wrapper to the HITheme APIs, allowing applications to be styled according to the current theme in use on Mac OS X.


By using these facilities, and bearing in mind the few limitations they impose, Qt applications can achieve a high level of integration with the Mac OSX desktop, including widgets of native appearance which follow the selected desktop theme.

Edited 2011-02-24 03:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


You are bothe correct ... It may not use the native pltform widgets ... but it does use the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports.

http://qt.nokia.com/products/library/modular-class-library


That just states it uses a native rendering subsystem, which is great for perf, but not much beyond that.


However, the Qt widgets can be made to conform to native widget appearance via the use of the Qstyle class:
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/qstyle.html
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/qmacstyle.html

and style sheets:
http://doc.qt.nokia.com/4.7/stylesheet.html


I love the flexibility, I really do, but a consistent native experience is as much about behavior as it is about look. The term "Look and FEEL" was coined for a reason.


By using these facilities, and bearing in mind the few limitations they impose, Qt applications can achieve a high level of integration with the Mac OSX desktop.


I don't think it's much of a problem on the desktop, as I've said before. However on mobile clients it becomes more of an issue in my opinion. Generally the way you interact with a device using finger gestures verus a mouse is way different. So there's a lot less room for behavioral error, things like target hit areas and the such need to remain consistent, there's a lot of small things that a lot of non-developers don't take into account, but that really do matter.

It doesn't matter if it's uniform across all platforms, but if users of platform X are conditioned to expect things a certain way, you're going to create a barrier to entry which I think is severely understated.

I like Qt, I think QML is great, and should be invested in more, but trying to be everything to everyone just makes you mediocre. It has legitimate gaps it can fill in Linux and become very successful in the process, and I just think it's bound to shine more there (and perhaps places like set top boxes ..)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

I have no citations from Nokia about widgets, but at least I had about native applications:

"Qt uses the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports"
http://qt.nokia.com/products

and it seems it was worth nothing, you said "Qt is good, hell it's nice, but it's not native." and nothing seemed to happen. Who am I supposed to believe?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I have no citations from Nokia about widgets, but at least I had about native applications:
""Qt uses the native graphics APIs of each platform it supports"
http://qt.nokia.com/products

and it seems it was worth nothing, you said "Qt is good, hell it's nice, but it's not native." and nothing seemed to happen. Who am I supposed to believe?
"

Native within the context of using native common controls. If you dont understand tbe topic, then dont hit "submit comment" and turn this into a semantics argument.

Reply Parent Score: 2