Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Mon 28th Feb 2011 11:23 UTC, submitted by Joao Luis
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "Now that the dust has settled after Stephen Elop's big announcement on the 11th February 2011, many have come to realise that actually Nokia's move towards a a new Ecosystem is not as bad as what they thought. [...] But what does all this mean for the Nokia Developers? When the proposed partnership with Microsoft was announced, many felt betrayed and worried about their future, but after having heard and assisted a number of workshops at the Nokia Developer Day at this years Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, earlier this month, their outlook towards the new ecosystem has taken a 180 degree turn and are now looking at the proposed partnership with a lot more enthusiasm, recognising the potential it will bring them in the coming months."
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RE[5]: Biased article
by Not2Sure on Mon 28th Feb 2011 18:41 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Biased article"
Not2Sure
Member since:
2009-12-07

Size of the package *ahem*

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Biased article
by dsmogor on Tue 1st Mar 2011 13:31 in reply to "RE[5]: Biased article"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

I asked about consumer perception of durability more that a feature parity.
Somehow consumers were convinced that a luxry good the smarthone definately is could be easily disposed like a say, mp3 player. The acceptance for poor durability regardless of the price point follows.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Biased article
by Laurence on Tue 1st Mar 2011 13:41 in reply to "RE[6]: Biased article"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I asked about consumer perception of durability more that a feature parity. Somehow consumers were convinced that a luxry good the smarthone definately is could be easily disposed like a say, mp3 player. The acceptance for poor durability regardless of the price point follows.

As I'd already said, it's simply because most smart phone owners don't buy their phone like they buy their MP3 player not laptop. But get it "free" on a contract or as a "hand me down" from a friend who's on a contract.

Obviously they/I still pay for the phone as the networks cover their cost with their phone tarif. However the perception of getting something for free is still there and thus the item is treated as desposable

Reply Parent Score: 2