Linked by David Adams on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 04:40 UTC, submitted by Amy Bennett
Java Later this year, Oracle will begin requiring people interested in gaining Java and Solaris certifications to attend "hands-on" training courses, at an additional cost of thousands of dollars. The new rule goes into effect Aug. 1 and regards Java Architect, Java Developer, Solaris System Administrator and Solaris Security Administrator certification paths, according to a notice on Oracle's website.
Thread beginning with comment 464634
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Disappointing
by Kroc on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 10:37 UTC in reply to "Disappointing"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

How are they going to get the people in the emerging economies building their infrastructure on solaris by raising the price barrier?


Oracle don’t have to, they operate at a high end and assume the low end is handled by everybody else.

India and China’s economies are rising and when companies there grow to a point that they need to do serious db stuff the low end can’t handle, they will come to Oracle. (that’s Oracles stance, anyway)

It’s sad, but this is how the corporate world works and Oracle have no trouble gaining business.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Disappointing
by Soulbender on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 16:05 in reply to "RE: Disappointing"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Exactly how is Java high-end?
Oh wait, it does hog all your memory, is unnecessary complex and makes you long for the clarity of Perl scripts. It's got "Enterprise" written all over it.

Reply Parent Score: 11

RE[3]: Disappointing
by moondevil on Thu 3rd Mar 2011 18:27 in reply to "RE[2]: Disappointing"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

It's high end in the context that nowadays almost all new software being written on the IT world is either Java or .Net based.

The multinational consulting company I work for, only gets projects in other languages, as "legacy" projects.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Disappointing
by Flatland_Spider on Fri 4th Mar 2011 05:23 in reply to "RE: Disappointing"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

Nothing beats Oracle when you have to do heavy database stuff. With DBs, people pay for that, and they should.

The problem is with Solaris, IBM and Red Hat will make sure Linux will scale from the low end to the high end, and Oracle is turning Solaris into a niche. It's not going to be cost effective when Linux will be "good enough", and there will be loads of cheap talent.

MS does this really well. They make sure there is tons of cheap talent which can implement their products.

Both of those countries could develop their own Oracle competitors. China is nationalistic/crazy enough that Beijing could mandate it and make it so. I can see China GPLing the whole thing and giving it away.

India may just want to bootstrap their own software sector. They aren't going to be cheap labor forever.

Anyway, Oracle makes great dBs, but I see the Sun acquisition as being an expensive failure of an experiment for Oracle, in the long term. Linux/Windows and x86/ARM are good enough, and businesses won't have to hire expensive niche talent. The only thing worth anything was gaining control of Java.

Reply Parent Score: 1