Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Apr 2011 19:50 UTC
Apple "Apple also heard about the theme and ad campaign. I received a call from our contact at Velti this evening as well as an email asking me to please take the theme out of Cydia. On the phone, he explained Apple had contacted Toyota and requested they remove the theme and stop the advertising campaign. They (Velti) in turn contacted me relaying the message. The reason Velti listed for the removal request of the theme emailed through our dev portal was 'Toyota's making us take it down...' Toyota had agreed to do so to 'maintain their good relationship with Apple', our Velti contact told me on the phone."
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RE[2]: Typical Apple
by tuzor on Tue 5th Apr 2011 21:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Typical Apple"
tuzor
Member since:
2007-08-07

That several people are doing something wrong does not mean that it becomes somehow more okay to do so...


Yes that is correct although in this case you can't expect anything else from Apple or anyone else in a similar situation.
I like the jailbreak community for what it brings to the table however Apple has some reasonable points to be fully against it.
One, app piracy and two, security reasons.
If they don't clearly show that they're against it, they will receive negative publicity every time there's an issue with either of the two. They already faced such problems when there was a security issue with jailbroken iPhones a couple of months ago. This spurred numerous misinformed articles about how the iPhone was insecure.

A major corporation coming out like this and backing the jailbreak community is a clear foul.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Typical Apple
by Neolander on Wed 6th Apr 2011 05:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Typical Apple"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I see several problems with this.

1/Any consumer-grade security system can and will be broken if there's an incentive to do so. By artificially heavily restricting what people can do with their iDevices, Apple creates a big incentive for hackers to break their security. That it is in the name of jailbreak or not is in the end unimportant: everyone loses.
2/Apple were not forced to restrict things like home screen customizations or USB transfers in order to prevent piracy. They could have used the security system of every single other phone, where DRMd files are put in a special folder which is not accessible via USB. In that case, it would be perfectly okay for them to patch any breach of security at this level.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Typical Apple
by Alfman on Wed 6th Apr 2011 05:46 in reply to "RE[3]: Typical Apple"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"1/Any consumer-grade security system can and will be broken if there's an incentive to do so. By artificially heavily restricting what people can do with their iDevices, Apple creates a big incentive for hackers to break their security."

That is correct.
Obviously the existence of jailbroken iphones is proof of security holes. It's somewhat ironic the existence of flaws can be beneficial to owners, who use them to unshackle restricted devices. Regardless, there is no denying that security is a real issue.

"2/Apple were not forced to restrict things like home screen customizations or USB transfers in order to prevent piracy. They could have used the security system of every single other phone, where DRMd files are put in a special folder which is not accessible via USB."

I hope everyone here knows why DRM is fundamentally broken, but if they insist on using it there is no need to reinvent the wheel: DRM files are encrypted so there isn't any need to protect the media/binary files themselves. The only thing that needs protection is the decoder+keys.

Of course the reasons apple restricts devices has nothing whatsoever to do with piracy, they want to control the platform and block competitors from directly reaching their customers. Every single apple move is carefully calculated to eliminate competitors.

Reply Parent Score: 2