Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 8th Apr 2011 08:10 UTC
Linux Well, this is fascinating. ASUS hasn't even released its Eee Pad Transformer yet, but it's already put up for download the source code to the Linux kernel used in the Android Honeycomb operating system the machine runs. In other words, Google isn't withholding anything it is not allowed to withhold. As said by many - storm, teacup, meet. Go here, select download, select Android.
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RE[3]: Kernel
by crimperman on Fri 8th Apr 2011 09:27 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Kernel"
crimperman
Member since:
2006-11-09

"It's all about making sure that AT THE VERY LEAST the licenses are not violated. That's important.


License violation would never happen in a company as rich and knowledgeable as Google (they've got a lot to lose). That's for small sweatshops mostly.
"

Surely the point of the storm-teacup bit is that Google did not have to make the kernel source available (to end users) as they were not distributing the binary (to end users). Asus are distributing the binaries and therefore need to comply with the licence terms as they are here.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Kernel
by Lennie on Fri 8th Apr 2011 10:43 in reply to "RE[3]: Kernel"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I'm sure Google does comply with the license by distributing the source of the kernel to ASUS. ;-)

ASUS could also have pointed to a download page on the site of ASUS or Google where you would need to login to download (the login is printed in the manual you got from ASUS).

I think this would still be complying the license, I'm glad they didn't go to such extremes.

The license does not say you need to make it public to everyone, just the people that got (in this case probably: bought) the 'product'.

They could also just include a CD with the manual.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Kernel
by umccullough on Fri 8th Apr 2011 16:23 in reply to "RE[4]: Kernel"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

ASUS could also have pointed to a download page on the site of ASUS or Google where you would need to login to download (the login is printed in the manual you got from ASUS).

I think this would still be complying the license, I'm glad they didn't go to such extremes.

The license does not say you need to make it public to everyone, just the people that got (in this case probably: bought) the 'product'.

They could also just include a CD with the manual.


And per GPL (and pretty much any other true OSS license), you as the end user are not restricted from then re-distributing that source again. Thus, there's little-to-no incentive to make it difficult to obtain FOSS source code for users - they have every right to just post it publicly anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 3