Linked by mrhasbean on Thu 28th Apr 2011 20:59 UTC
Google In a move touted as one to "make Apps easier to adopt and manage", Google has announced that it will reduce the number of free users from 50 down to just 10 before businesses have to sign up for its paid service. This follows a previous reduction from 100 to 50. Google claims that existing users won't be affected, but we'll just have to wait and see how long that lasts. And if you don't want your whole life tracked and sold off to the highest bidder by Google's "free" and "open" technologies but would like access to actual free or low cost services there is a decent article here that shines some light on your options.
Thread beginning with comment 471309
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Well
by mrhasbean on Thu 28th Apr 2011 22:25 UTC in reply to "Well"
mrhasbean
Member since:
2006-04-03

Almost every alternative the blogger explores is worse in one respect or another, more costly, and perhaps even more risky.


Except in all cases the alternatives don't sell off your usage data for their advertising network. Are you suggesting we shouldn't sign up for various online services because they then all have access to our IP address and whatever username / password combination we use for that site along with whatever other personal information their signup process requires? It's not about the data they collect - every online service collects some data in order to actually function - it's what they do with the data that's the problem.

Apple bought iCloud.com for $4.5 MILLION to do everything exactly the same way Google is doing, just without the "free" or the "open" and with even more restrictions.


Everyone touts Google's services as being free, but they're far from it, and they are certainly NOT open - opensource != open. What's your personal information worth? Mine's certainly worth a hell of a lot more than a couple bucks a month that I might have to pay for alternatives. At least Apple are up-front about the restrictions and costs involved, and actually give you an option BEFORE you use their products or services to opt out if you don't like their policies, unlike Google who don't give you that option until, well, ever...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Well
by bouhko on Thu 28th Apr 2011 22:44 in reply to "RE: Well"
bouhko Member since:
2010-06-24

I don't know any other company (and certainly not Apple) that does that :
http://www.dataliberation.org/home

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Well
by JAlexoid on Fri 29th Apr 2011 01:26 in reply to "RE: Well"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Except in all cases the alternatives don't sell off your usage data for their advertising network. Are you suggesting we shouldn't sign up for various online services because they then all have access to our IP address and whatever username / password combination we use for that site along with whatever other personal information their signup process requires? It's not about the data they collect - every online service collects some data in order to actually function - it's what they do with the data that's the problem.


Again, can you answer my question. How does an advertiser get personal information for each visiting person from Google? As an advertiser I would like to get that information, but Google does not give me that ;) Apparently you know how to get it... or you are full of paranoid BS.

Everyone touts Google's services as being free, but they're far from it, and they are certainly NOT open - opensource != open.

Sorry. When did I pay for the free tier of GMail? Hm... Never in 7 years. Ads? I don't see them, I use an IMAP client.
And when are their services being touted as open? And they are not opensource.

What's your personal information worth? Mine's certainly worth a hell of a lot more than a couple bucks a month that I might have to pay for alternatives. At least Apple are up-front about the restrictions and costs involved, and actually give you an option BEFORE you use their products or services to opt out if you don't like their policies, unlike Google who don't give you that option until, well, ever...

Yes, Apple is up-front with CYA entries in the EULA. Apple is already in the advertisement business. And they have had your sociological profile since before iAds.
As for opting out, there is that button called "Privacy" at the bottom of Google's main page.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Well
by molnarcs on Fri 29th Apr 2011 03:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Well"
molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

Guys, he's never going to reply.* mrhasbean never replies to anything that contradicts his anti-google rants. And he's going to repost the same shit next time something is posted about Google (or Apple). He's our local troll/Apple fanboy.

*well, he may reply, but he'll conveniently ignore any of your points that he can not counter...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Well
by BallmerKnowsBest on Fri 29th Apr 2011 13:47 in reply to "RE: Well"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

Damn, now that's dedication! Not only have you trolled the comments of nearly every Google-related story in the past year and a half - but now you're actually contributing stories to troll in. Bravo, I must admire your ingenuity and tip my hat to you, sir.

If I may be so bold, perhaps you should try something other than the usual post-and-run strategy this time? I think people are starting to see through that one.

Yours in trolling,
- BallmerKnowsBest

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Well
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 29th Apr 2011 14:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Well"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Yeah well I decided to let his post through because, you know, openness and freedom and shit.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Well
by WereCatf on Sat 30th Apr 2011 11:48 in reply to "RE: Well"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Except in all cases the alternatives don't sell off your usage data for their advertising network.


Google doesn't sell specifically your data alone, either. They sell usage data in large bunches that are combined in such a way as not to be able to pick specific individual from all that data, and as such I see absolutely nothing wrong with that. Besides, EVERYONE these days does that, even credit card companies. Do you stop using your credit cards too?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Well
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 30th Apr 2011 12:29 in reply to "RE[2]: Well"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

On top of that - ads are a fact of life. I'd rather they are targeted and potentially relevant than entirely random.

mrhasbean being our resident Apple and anti-Google troll, it's always fun to see him completely ignore the fact that Apple is sitting on a massive body of user data as well (iTunes Music/App and Mac App Store), while Apple is also an advertising company. However, when Google does it, it's wrong, but when Apple does it, it's okay. It's gruberlogic.

mrhasbean also often resorts to the "think of the children" arguments regarding his own children, so let me ask you this, mrhasbean: without targeted advertising, children could be exposed to naughty advertisements! See! Google is protecting our children, while you are advocating they be exposed to sexual advertisements and whatnot.

See, I can troll too. It's easy!

Reply Parent Score: 1