Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 28th Apr 2011 22:33 UTC
Legal This is interesting. I've been saying for a while now that both Apple and Microsoft are hard at work making Android as undesirable as possible. Sadly, they're not doing this by making their own products better, but by trying to make it seem as if Android isn't free due to patent costs and such. It looks like Barnes & Noble is the first company to openly say the same.
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Android is *Unattractive* already
by mrhasbean on Thu 28th Apr 2011 23:49 UTC
mrhasbean
Member since:
2006-04-03

For anyone but Google and the phone manufacturers Android is unattractive for the very reasons most of those here love it, and I'm not talking about it's "bucket of bums" interface.

If you take a look at the desktop OS market, the only ones who've really made a long term profit from it are a handful of software companies, the largest being the creator of the most dominant OS, and some of the hardware companies. And of course Apple, who've done their own thing.

Of those software companies who've done well over a long period of time, most are players in niche or specialist areas of the market. Database, games, vertical markets, etc. But in order to do that all have had to employ either copy protection or activation schemes that are both costly and require resources, simply because of how easy it is to pirate software.

Then Apple produced the App Store, which many here hate with a passion, but it answers these problems for developers, and we've already seen a massive number of developers make money from their creations for he first time. Arguably some maybe shouldn't have, but that's another argument. The reality is that Android, with it's "Windows like" free-for-all mentality, is very unattractive from a development perspective to anyone other than those who have other means to pay the bills.

So while I don't think Microsoft - or anyone for that matter - should be trying to enforce patents that are invalid, as a business proposition Android is already very unattractive to anyone other than Google, the phone manufacturers and a handful of big software / content companies - just like Windows...

Reply Score: -2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Then Apple produced the App Store, which many here hate with a passion, but it answers these problems for developers, and we've already seen a massive number of developers make money from their creations for he first time. Arguably some maybe shouldn't have, but that's another argument. The reality is that Android, with it's "Windows like" free-for-all mentality, is very unattractive from a development perspective to anyone other than those who have other means to pay the bills.

So while I don't think Microsoft - or anyone for that matter - should be trying to enforce patents that are invalid, as a business proposition Android is already very unattractive to anyone other than Google, the phone manufacturers and a handful of big software / content companies - just like Windows...


Ok... Want some hard reality check?
AppStore is great for users, Apple and a handful of developers. Otherwise selling mobile apps is a dead end these days.

Oh how many mobile app startup companies I've seen go down during 1.5years. Literally every single one closed shop. The only ones that stayed in business are the ones that offer services to companies in building apps for them(as part of marketing campaigns or added value to other services). And quite a few of them had "best selling" and "featured" apps.

That leads to the "fun fact" - AppStore and Apple's $1 app ecosystem results in income that can't sustain mobile app development. And it's not limited to AppStore, it's Android Market also. Though it might put some food on a table of a single programmer, nothing more.

But hey, you have to actually live and breathe startup companies to know that. And those "We've made a million selling our app" stories are the exceptions that prove the rule.

By the way a million earned on AppStore results in 700'000 in cash. And with 5 people team it's a good income. But look at who rakes in a million a month?(I doubt that they make a million in AppStore btw) AngryBirds! Can you beat them? No way in hell! Then calculate how much you need to make, as a legal entity, each month to get to a million. The incomes are very low...

Reply Parent Score: 4

jimmystewpot Member since:
2006-01-19

While I agree with some of the points of your discussion I see (as an android user) that the number of quality pay for applications on android has been dramatically improving over the last 6 months. If the momentum continues there will be a great deal of money to be made through the market for even small developers. The key issue with any app store is how to distinguish yourself from the other apps, that is where the challenge lies for new entries into any market place on either apple, android, blackberry etc.. being a featured app may provide some inroads to profits however it is hard to keep that momentum when the application is not featured...

The good news is that many of the traditional big software companies have very little in the mobile space so it's allowing the small guys to grow, where traditionally the cost to enter the market is too high for small developers.

Reply Parent Score: 3