Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th May 2011 21:53 UTC, submitted by kragil
Graphics, User Interfaces "Pinta, a 'lightweight' open source raster image editor, turned 1.0 on April 27, offering Linux users another choice for simple image editing. Pinta is intended to be a clone of Paint.NET, the Windows-only raster editor written in .NET. As such, it uses Mono under the hood, but it gains the ability to run equally well on Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows. Is it a replacement for GIMP or Krita? That depends on what you need to do." What I like about Pinta is that I actually caused its creation in the first place.
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RE[4]: Comment by orestes
by gtada on Thu 12th May 2011 08:23 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by orestes"
gtada
Member since:
2005-10-12

I'll check it out again... I've been looking for a good painting program on Linux (GIMP definitely is not it).

I wish Autodesk ported Sketchbook Designer to Linux. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by orestes
by lemur2 on Thu 12th May 2011 09:39 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by orestes"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'll check it out again... I've been looking for a good painting program on Linux (GIMP definitely is not it).

I wish Autodesk ported Sketchbook Designer to Linux. ;)


Autodesk Sketchbook Designer claims to have this primary feature:
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=15793589&siteID=12...

"In addition to the sketching capabilities and quality results that professionals have come to expect from Autodesk SketchBook Pro software, SketchBook Designer enables professional designers and artists to use a hybrid paint and vector workflow for concept design illustration and graphic design."

To get the equivalent functionality on a Linux desktop, use a good raster paint program in conjunction with a vector drawing program. It is better if you choose a pair that are designed to work with one another.

I would suggest Krita (for raster graphics) in conjunction with Calligra Karbon (for vector graphics).

http://www.calligra-suite.org/karbon/screenshots/
http://www.calligra-suite.org/karbon/features/

The Calligra suite uses a concept called "flake shapes" that allows each component of the suite to exchange elements with other component programs.

http://slangkamp.wordpress.com/2010/12/12/vector-file-import-for-kr...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flake_%28KDE%29

This concept of flake shapes gives Krita some vector drawing capability:
http://slangkamp.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/kritasvg.png

However, if you don't like Karbon, then there are some other good choices that will work reasonably well in conjunction with Krita, although a little less well integrated.

http://inkscape.org/screenshots/index.php?lang=en
http://inkscape.org/showcase/index.php?lang=en

http://www.libreoffice.org/features/draw/

You don't have to wait for Autodesk ... they probably can't compete on a Linux desktop now anyway.

Edited 2011-05-12 09:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by orestes
by boudewijn on Thu 12th May 2011 13:38 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by orestes"
boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

If you give Krita a try and find something missing or have a question or a comment, don't hesitate to drop by on #krita on irc.freenode.net or on the Krita forums (http://forum.kde.org/viewforum.php?f=136). We'd be glad to hear from you!

Boudewijn, Krita maintainer.

Reply Parent Score: 4