Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th May 2011 20:37 UTC
Apple I have personally tried to pretty much let the whole MAC Defender trojan thing pass by, since we're not a security website. However, we have an interesting turn of events this week. An article over at Ars Technica quotes several anonymous Apple Store employees as saying that the infection rate of Macs brought into the Apple store has gone up considerably. More interestingly though, Apple's official policy states that Apple Store employees are not allowed to talk about infections to anyone - they're not even allowed to inform Mac owners if they find the infection without the customer's knowledge. Another interesting tidbit: Apple mandates the use of Norton Antivirus on company Macs, according to one Apple Store genius.
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Comment by Brynet
by brynet on Fri 20th May 2011 22:33 UTC
brynet
Member since:
2010-03-02

It's a Unix system, if you willingly elevated the permissions of a 3rd party executable, well then you're an idiot.

I'm all for blaming the vendor for attracting stupid uninformed users though, there was an opportunity to teach them how not to blindly trust.. wait a minute, wasn't there an article about that the other day? something about the mind of a Mac user is similar to that of a religulous loser?

Edited 2011-05-20 22:38 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Brynet
by bouhko on Sat 21st May 2011 01:23 in reply to "Comment by Brynet"
bouhko Member since:
2010-06-24

Sure, because you can fix your pipe system, you know exactly how your car work, you can pilot the airplane you are taking and you don't need to go to the doctor because you have a medical degree.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Brynet
by TechGeek on Sat 21st May 2011 01:46 in reply to "RE: Comment by Brynet"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

And yet for most of those (assuming code enforcement for plumbers and inspection permissions for mechanics) you need a piece of paper that says you know what your doing. Being a stupid user is bad enough, but insisting that your user base stays stupid to sell more product is pretty much crap. People and their false idols indeed...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Brynet
by brynet on Sat 21st May 2011 02:01 in reply to "RE: Comment by Brynet"
brynet Member since:
2010-03-02

Sorry, but your analogy doesn't fit.. but if you're comfortable hiding behind them, you don't need to be a locksmith to lock your doors, but you need to be smart enough to use the keys.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Brynet
by Nth_Man on Sat 21st May 2011 07:06 in reply to "Comment by Brynet"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

> there was an opportunity to teach them how not to
> blindly trust
So do you want them to trust you, specially when you tell them not to trust the others.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Brynet
by brynet on Sat 21st May 2011 18:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by Brynet"
brynet Member since:
2010-03-02

No, not even me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Brynet - marketing
by jabbotts on Sat 21st May 2011 15:10 in reply to "Comment by Brynet"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

If you provide even a Unix based system and all your marketing relies on "we're invulnerable to everything bad", I can't really hold average user's fully responsible.

One's user manual says the microwave oven makes food hot, they believe it and treat it as such. One's user manual says the computer can't be affected by malware, they believe it and treat it as such.

Reply Parent Score: 2

brynet Member since:
2010-03-02

The problem is that they're treating a computer like an appliance.

Reply Parent Score: 3