Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Jun 2011 20:40 UTC
Legal "The Supreme Court ruled against Microsoft on Thursday in its appeal of a record $290 million jury verdict for infringing a small Canadian software firm's patent. The justices unanimously upheld an appeals court's ruling that went against the world's largest software company in its legal battle with Toronto-based i4i Limited Partnership. The smaller company had argued that Microsoft Word had infringed its method for editing documents. Microsoft contended that i4i's patent was invalid."
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Bad
by mat69 on Thu 9th Jun 2011 22:06 UTC
mat69
Member since:
2006-03-29

That is really bad. What this ruling shows is that crap can uphold all instances of justice in the US.

I fear that soon not only large companies publishing their products in the USA will be targeted, but also small entities, be it companies or whatever.

At one point patents were meant to advocate innovation. Now their only point is to kill innovation or to profit of others' innovations. Instead of supporting those who innovate software patents only support parasites.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Bad
by Alfman on Thu 9th Jun 2011 22:23 in reply to "Bad"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

mat69,

"That is really bad. What this ruling shows is that crap can uphold all instances of justice in the US."

It sucks, but that's the law.

You can't blame the supreme court here as much as the corrupt congress and corps who forced a broken patent system down everyone's throats.


"I fear that soon not only large companies publishing their products in the USA will be targeted, but also small entities, be it companies or whatever."

That's the scary part, what happens if patent holders begin targeting small entities on a large scale?

It's not really possible to write software without infringing. Software patents mean large legal burdens and expenses with absolutely nothing in return for independent developers.

The only saving grace for the US patent system today is that it has been very poorly enforced against small developers.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Bad
by JAlexoid on Thu 9th Jun 2011 23:34 in reply to "RE: Bad"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

You can't blame the supreme court here as much as the corrupt congress and corps who forced a broken patent system down everyone's throats.

And who's one of the biggest supporters of that system? Microsoft! Sorry for the profanity, but Microsoft just got flung their own poo right in their face!

The only saving grace for the US patent system today is that it has been very poorly enforced against small developers.

I fear that Lodsys might prove that that statement will not be true for much longer.

Edited 2011-06-09 23:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Bad
by TechGeek on Fri 10th Jun 2011 02:27 in reply to "RE: Bad"
TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

Actually, this is all the Supreme Court's fault. They have had two cases in front of them now that hinge on software patents. They had the option (at least in the Bilski case) to throw the cases out based solely on the fact that software shouldn't be patentable. Software is only patentable because the the ninth circuit court who oversees patent cases decided it should be. Their ruling needs overturned. There is no law expressly permitting software patents, its all based on case law.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Bad
by WorknMan on Fri 10th Jun 2011 03:27 in reply to "Bad"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

That is really bad.


Perhaps not. If enough of these giant corporations start taking it up the ass from patent trolls, maybe they'll buy some new laws that put the smackdown on software patents. Or, at least severely limit their scope.

Reply Parent Score: 3