Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Jun 2011 14:23 UTC, submitted by Valhalla
General Development "PathScale announced today that the EKOPath 4 Compiler Suite is now available as an open source project and free download for Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris. This release includes documentation and the complete development stack, including compiler, debugger, assembler, runtimes and standard libraries. EKOPath is the product of years of ongoing development, representing one of the industries highest performance Intel 64 and AMD C, C++ and Fortran compilers." More here.
Thread beginning with comment 477279
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
wide ranging oss performance uplift
by project_2501 on Wed 15th Jun 2011 15:24 UTC
project_2501
Member since:
2006-03-20

Image the impact of this on future Linux/BSD distributions, server software, desktop software, usability, ... it will be a step change upwards that the competition will face.

I'm looking forward to faster web application servers, faster encoding, smoother and snappier desktops, quicker bootups, ... everything really should see an uplift.

Reply Score: 4

coreyography Member since:
2009-03-06

Not sure how much impact it (the compiler, not the C++ library) is going to have on the BSDs, since it is GPL licensed. The viewpoint on licensing of the system compiler seems to vary among the BSD camps, but I suspect at some level they'd all like to see something BSD (or compatible) licensed.

That said, options are always good. The performance with this may overcome some people's philosophical objections to its license.

Reply Parent Score: 1

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

So.... Aren't BSDs already compiled by a GPL GCC?

Edited 2011-06-15 22:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Not sure how much impact it (the compiler, not the C++ library) is going to have on the BSDs, since it is GPL licensed. The viewpoint on licensing of the system compiler seems to vary among the BSD camps, but I suspect at some level they'd all like to see something BSD (or compatible) licensed. That said, options are always good. The performance with this may overcome some people's philosophical objections to its license.


You do not need a BSD-licensed compiler to compile BSD.

This is the same deal as for books, in that the exact same copyright laws apply. You can write a book using MS Office, but even in doing so all rights to the book itself still belong to you, and not to Microsoft. Your work is still your work, no matter who made the tools that enabled you to do your work.

Reply Parent Score: 3