Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 19th Jun 2011 18:26 UTC
Windows Way back in old and boring January of this year, Microsoft announced they would be working together with the Windows Phone 7 homebrew community, with the goal of creating a stable, supported way for homebrew developers and people interested in homebrew applications to enable side-loading on their WP7 devices. Well, they took their sweet time, but the ChevronWP7 team (Rafael Rivera, Chris Walsh, and Long Zheng) and Microsoft have just announced the results.
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RE[3]: Hmmm...
by ourcomputerbloke on Sun 19th Jun 2011 21:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm..."
ourcomputerbloke
Member since:
2011-05-12

I'm 99.9% sure that homebrew falls under the ***Open Signed Online***
And Apple allows none. So yeah... Apple is till the odd one out.


I've read this here a few times in various articles, and someone, can't remember who, posted this link

http://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/distribute.html

that has a section about Ad Hoc Distribution,

Share your application with up to 100 other iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch users with Ad Hoc distribution. Share your application through email, or by posting it to a website or server.


So I'm a bit confused. Can someone clarify for me how Apple is the odd one out when it seems their option is less restrictive than Symbian? Is there something I'm misinterpreting?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Hmmm...
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 19th Jun 2011 21:25 in reply to "RE[3]: Hmmm..."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

So I'm a bit confused. Can someone clarify for me how Apple is the odd one out when it seems their option is less restrictive than Symbian? Is there something I'm misinterpreting?


By default, Symbian blocks applications without a certificate. However, you can disable this block - you'll get a warning you can dismiss. This way, you can distribute an application any way you like. The OP failed to mention this.

just to clarify: this is a switch in the UI - not a hack. It's implemented by Symbian developers. Go to Tools > App mgr > Options > Settings.

Edited 2011-06-19 21:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Hmmm...
by ourcomputerbloke on Sun 19th Jun 2011 21:32 in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm..."
ourcomputerbloke Member since:
2011-05-12

By default, Symbian blocks applications without a certificate. However, you can disable this block - you'll get a warning you can dismiss. This way, you can distribute an application any way you like. The OP failed to mention this.


Ahh ok. So are applications distributed in this manner able to access the full functionality of the device, or are there certain things that are available only to signed applications?

Just so we know we're comparing "Apples" with apples so to speak.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Hmmm...
by VZsolt on Mon 20th Jun 2011 04:52 in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm..."
VZsolt Member since:
2008-10-31

Wrong!

The UI setting you mentioned provides another level of filtering. If you set it to All, you'll be able to install self-signed applications (with seriously limited capabilities) along with Express/Certified Signed applications. The other choice disallows self-signed stuff.

There is no user accessible setting to disable the Platform Security's certificate checks. It's possible though by using ROMPatcher+ for example, but that's not less complicated than jailbreaking an iPhone for example.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Hmmm...
by tuma324 on Mon 20th Jun 2011 11:22 in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm..."
tuma324 Member since:
2010-04-09

"So I'm a bit confused. Can someone clarify for me how Apple is the odd one out when it seems their option is less restrictive than Symbian? Is there something I'm misinterpreting?


By default, Symbian blocks applications without a certificate. However, you can disable this block - you'll get a warning you can dismiss. This way, you can distribute an application any way you like. The OP failed to mention this.

just to clarify: this is a switch in the UI - not a hack. It's implemented by Symbian developers. Go to Tools > App mgr > Options > Settings.
"

Symbian is still a PITA even with that option of disabling SSL, I have a Nokia phone and every time I wanted to install an app I would get these SSL errors, tried to disable it, tried changing system date, tried everything, but the error still persisted, and it wasn't a app-specific error because I have tried with a few apps.

Not to mention most apps on Symbian suck big time. I made a mental note to never use or buy a Nokia or Symbian based phone ever again.

Android is my next phone.

Edited 2011-06-20 11:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Hmmm...
by thegman on Mon 20th Jun 2011 08:16 in reply to "RE[3]: Hmmm..."
thegman Member since:
2007-01-30

Apple ad-hoc distribution only allows up to 100 users, so it's good for closed-beta tests, or maybe an app only used by staff of a small company. But it's not useful for anyone wanting their app to be used by more than 100 people.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Hmmm...
by JAlexoid on Mon 20th Jun 2011 11:14 in reply to "RE[3]: Hmmm..."
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Duude... You can't even install that app on your OWN device without paying a yearly $99 fee or jailbreaking.

Reply Parent Score: 2