Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Jun 2011 22:51 UTC
Mac OS X "Apple has now released Mac OS X 10.6.8, the eighth maintenance update for Snow Leopard, via Software Update. The update offers a number of fixes implemented since the release of Mac OS X 10.6.7 in late March."
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kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Mate, I've said this numerous times - you're comparing apples to oranges; you're comparing one side of the industry with a constant ISA/architecture to Apple that has moved from PowerPC to Intel. If Apple were using Intel all this time but artificially blocked off all machines from 5 years ago from using Mac OS X then your point would stand but that simply isn't the situation as it stands today.

There are less and less PowerPC computers out there and to be completely honest if you've gotten 5-6 years out of a computer I think you're doing pretty damn good in my books. I would be saying this even if I owned a PC, I've gone from an eMac to an iMac/iBook to a MacBook to a MacBook Pro/iMac - I find it funny that people scream and wail with pain when it comes to computer upgrades but don't batter and eye lid when it comes to upgrading their car, television or some other piece of equipment of equal or greater value within the same 5-6 year time frame.

Reply Parent Score: 3

malxau Member since:
2005-12-04

Mate, I've said this numerous times - you're comparing apples to oranges; you're comparing one side of the industry with a constant ISA/architecture to Apple that has moved from PowerPC to Intel.


That's true, although note that other vendors are much more reluctant to do things like this. Apple have changed CPUs a couple times (68k->ppc->intel), OSes a couple times (os9->osx->ios), and provided relatively poor compatibility experiences along the way. Apple users should not expect that today's arch will be tomorrow's arch, although PC users take that for granted.

...There are less and less PowerPC computers out there and to be completely honest if you've gotten 5-6 years out of a computer I think you're doing pretty damn good in my books.


My point is that I got around 2, not 5-6. The machine hasn't been in serious use for a long time.

...people scream and wail with pain when it comes to computer upgrades but don't batter and eye lid when it comes to upgrading their car, television or some other piece of equipment of equal or greater value within the same 5-6 year time frame.


I'd say the reverse. I've never upgraded any of those things in a 5-6 year timeframe. Computer upgrades have always been rapid, often artificially rapid. I'm shocked that many businesses replace PCs every 3-4 years even though the functionality/value that they get barely changes at each cycle. How often do they replace desks?

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

That's true, although note that other vendors are much more reluctant to do things like this. Apple have changed CPUs a couple times (68k->ppc->intel), OSes a couple times (os9->osx->ios), and provided relatively poor compatibility experiences along the way. Apple users should not expect that today's arch will be tomorrow's arch, although PC users take that for granted.


I have had a re-read with what you said and I feel your pain and if I was Steve Jobs I would have offered a 1/3 trade in programme on new Intel computers (for PowerPC owners) but hey - thats me, Mr Generous.

I feel for you and the transition wasn't smooth and the support hat Apple claimed they would provide was never something they lived up to but at the same time it is pretty silly to grind an axe over an issue that happened over 4 years ago.

I'd say the reverse. I've never upgraded any of those things in a 5-6 year timeframe. Computer upgrades have always been rapid, often artificially rapid. I'm shocked that many businesses replace PCs every 3-4 years even though the functionality/value that they get barely changes at each cycle. How often do they replace desks?


Most companies don't own the machine, they lease it, the company who owns them can write it off over 2-3 years via the tax system (many countries have favourable tax arrangements that encourage businesses to depreciate their equipment faster).

You maybe the reverse but casual walking around down the road tells a different story.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I find it funny that people scream and wail with pain when it comes to computer upgrades but don't batter and eye lid when it comes to upgrading their car, television or some other piece of equipment of equal or greater value within the same 5-6 year time frame.

I think it has to do with the fact that computers are multi-purpose machines which operate on data.

If I replaced my bike with a new one in the same category and price range, I'd just spend an afternoon setting some things up and it's good to go. The controls and the capabilities of the machine don't change much. Maybe there's one more or one less gear on the back, but this you get used to in a week.

For computers, it's a different story. Computers and their OSs are shipped in a state where they're not good at anything useful. You need to clean up the mess that the manufacturer has left, install your own software, hope that it works (and, in case of PPC software on x86, it probably won't), move your data, discover that your data is incompatible with the newer versions of the software you're using, which you have been forced to buy because your old ones don't work with your new computers... And once everything is done, you get a machine that works in a significantly different way and have to relearn lots of your everyday habits from the ground up.

Getting a new computer is not like setting up a bike or car and getting used to it. There's a whole lot of pain and mess involved. That's why people are not as much willing to do it, I think.

Edited 2011-06-25 08:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I think it has to do with the fact that computers are multi-purpose machines which operate on data.


Or the fact that the majority of people see computers as this magical box that whirls, whizzes and does amazing stuff instead of seeing what it really is, a glorified machine that allows you to achieve certain things.

If I replaced my bike with a new one in the same category and price range, I'd just spend an afternoon setting some things up and it's good to go. The controls and the capabilities of the machine don't change much. Maybe there's one more or one less gear on the back, but this you get used to in a week.


I can do the same thing; I purchased an iMac just recently, I setup my new machine, hooked up my machine, downloaded the applications I bought on AppStore, and installed some updates - within around 1-2 hours I was up and running.

For computers, it's a different story. Computers and their OSs are shipped in a state where they're not good at anything useful. You need to clean up the mess that the manufacturer has left, install your own software, hope that it works (and, in case of PPC software on x86, it probably won't), move your data, discover that your data is incompatible with the newer versions of the software you're using, which you have been forced to buy because your old ones don't work with your new computers... And once everything is done, you get a machine that works in a significantly different way and have to relearn lots of your everyday habits from the ground up.

Getting a new computer is not like setting up a bike or car and getting used to it. There's a whole lot of pain and mess involved. That's why people are not as much willing to do it, I think.


How has Mac OS X 'change significantly' (same can be said for Windows)? minor changes here and there, a few additional features added but more or less the fundamentals haven't changed. When it comes to applications - the majority of people around the world on their computer don't run anything fancy; Windows, maybe a copy of Microsoft Office, and if you're lucky a pirated copy of Photoshop or Photoshop elements they got with their multi-functional printer.

As for pain, there is as much or as little pain as you want to impose upon yourself - I've seen experts go to hell and back because their setup was an disorganised mess whilst on the other hand I've seen novices following guides, back up their stuff, clean upgrade Windows and then put their stuff back on within a few hours.

Reply Parent Score: 2