Linked by David Adams on Sat 20th Aug 2011 15:38 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Editorial In five years, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst sees the traditional desktop becoming obsolete.
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Business Computers
by MDGeist on Sat 20th Aug 2011 17:38 UTC
MDGeist
Member since:
2005-07-12

I don't see this happening, especially in the business sector. Mobile computing may be fine for many people, but businesses will need desktops/laptops for far longer. There are many pieces of software that won't run on tablets or phones, such as, accounting software, payroll, hospital records and so forth. Also, there are still many security concerns that plague portable devices, weather they use 3/4G or wireless.

Cloud computing is a relatively new player and it may very well help extend the life of older computers to the point that the power of the desktop won't matter much.

My 2 cents.

Reply Score: 7

RE: Business Computers
by shotsman on Sun 21st Aug 2011 05:57 in reply to "Business Computers"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

The RH guy was talking about the future.

So suffix many of your points with the word 'yet' and suddenly what he is saying makes a lot of sense.

Sure there will be people who need a traditional desktop (me included) but personally I think that the majority of bog standard users will be able to do everything they need without using a traditional desktop.

AFAIK, Windows 8(Metro) is going to dumb down the desktop even further and make it look like a giant WP7. If you can use that then you have to ask yourself, do you need a traditional desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Business Computers
by jbauer on Sun 21st Aug 2011 08:25 in reply to "RE: Business Computers"
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

The RH guy was talking about the future.

So suffix many of your points with the word 'yet' and suddenly what he is saying makes a lot of sense.


That prediction was already made for netbooks.

Of course, that was a cool thing to say when Linux was supposed to completely rule the netbook market...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Business Computers
by RalphZiggy on Sun 21st Aug 2011 14:46 in reply to "Business Computers"
RalphZiggy Member since:
2011-08-21

tablet or laptop, doesn't matter, it's mobile and they'll merge. In fact there are already combination tablet/laptops out there. My employer is tearing out traditional desktop pc and putting in either thin clients (that start with browser for access to server running windows apps remotely), or laptops or all-in-one PC doing what thin client does. Traditional desktop workstation in the corporation is a pain in the neck for management.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Business Computers
by BluenoseJake on Sun 21st Aug 2011 16:47 in reply to "RE: Business Computers"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I work for a University, and like any organization that deals with confidential data, having your employees being able to undock their computers and lose them on the bus will be an unmitigated disaster, look at all the laptops that are lost and stolen now.

No, the corporate world will stay with tradition desktops for the foreseeable future, because managing them may be hard, but it makes managing the data easier, and safer.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Business Computers
by Delgarde on Mon 22nd Aug 2011 01:45 in reply to "RE: Business Computers"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

tablet or laptop, doesn't matter, it's mobile and they'll merge. In fact there are already combination tablet/laptops out there. My employer is tearing out traditional desktop pc and putting in either thin clients (that start with browser for access to server running windows apps remotely), or laptops or all-in-one PC doing what thin client does. Traditional desktop workstation in the corporation is a pain in the neck for management.


It's a pain, yes - but so are thin clients. That's been done many times over the years, and every time, the world has moved away from them again. Remember the "network computer" fashion of the '90s, and the many predictions that the traditional desktop would soon be obsolete? Yeah.

Reply Parent Score: 3