Linked by umad on Thu 25th Aug 2011 22:51 UTC
Apple I thought OSNews would be a good forum to talk about a matter that has been weighing on my mind lately primarily because the site has been so focused on Apple's patents and litigation as of late. The news that HP, the largest PC manufacturer in the world is spinning off or getting out of this business is what really prompted me to write this article.
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apple always blows it
by TechGeek on Fri 26th Aug 2011 01:21 UTC
TechGeek
Member since:
2006-01-14

Apple's biggest problem is that it borrows all the ideas it has. Sure, it does a great job of polishing and selling them. But at the end of the day it takes them from the people who actually do the development. There isn't anything in there products that didn't exist in other devices first. Their problem is that the competition is getting better while iOS has started taking cues from Android. And with every company working on Android while only Apple works on iOS, its a losing battle. They are trying to slow the slide with litigation, but that will only get them so far. At the end of the day, their refusal to license their OS's to other manufacturers will only hurt them.

Reply Score: 2

RE: apple always blows it
by galvanash on Fri 26th Aug 2011 03:24 in reply to "apple always blows it"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Apple's biggest problem is that it borrows all the ideas it has.


You know, I see this kind of comment posted all the time. There is certainly truth to it, but it simply doesn't mean anything. Apple is not and has never been successful because of ideas (regardless of what they or others say).

Everyone borrows ideas, singling out Apple (or Microsoft, or anyone else) is just a waste of typing. You want to ridicule them because of their recent litigation rampage be my guest, but this whole business of "borrowing ideas" is just stupid - ideas don't matter in isolation. For every really good, unique idea there is almost always a string of failed products before someone finally hits a homerun.

Apple's recent success boils down to two things - timing and design. Its not the "idea" of the product that matters - the mouse was invented in the 60s but no one cared. It is one of the most important inventions in computing history, and it slept quietly for over 20 years because:

1. The timing was completely wrong - there was nothing compelling you could do with it because all the other stuff you would need to exploit it's capabilities didn't exist yet. It was like someone inventing fax machines when there was no telephone system yet - you had to plug two of them into each other with a cable. Neat, it can send copies across the room... Who cares?

2. The design was shit. The ball mouse (patented in 1972) was MUCH better than the original wheel design and allowed a small enough form factor to use it rather comfortably. Even then, in 1972 there was STILL no compelling use for the damn things...

Apple has a knack for getting the timing right... and more importantly - the design. Design is not how something looks, it is how it works and it includes all of its usability tradeoffs. You can say what you want about iPads - they are absolutely not a unique idea but the timing was right and the design was too.

That is all there is to it - timing and design. Ideas without both of those going for them are nothing more than wishful thinking.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: apple always blows it
by AdamW on Fri 26th Aug 2011 03:34 in reply to "RE: apple always blows it"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

"Everyone borrows ideas, singling out Apple (or Microsoft, or anyone else) is just a waste of typing. You want to ridicule them because of their recent litigation rampage be my guest, but this whole business of "borrowing ideas" is just stupid - ideas don't matter in isolation. For every really good, unique idea there is almost always a string of failed products before someone finally hits a homerun. "

This. Exactly this. This is the real issue with software patents: everyone is standing on everyone else's shoulders _all the time_, but some of them are self-important enough to decide that their trivial step down the road everyone is travelling is Special and Awesome and Important and deserves protection.

If everyone who ever came up with some trivial step forward in software patented it, it would become utterly impossible to get anywhere, but that's just the practical issue (and sadly, we're getting quite close to that point); really it's more the sheer asshattery of 'hey, I had a neat idea, I'm gonna file a patent and sit on it!' that gets me. Anyone working in software is building on far more significant ideas that came before and were put in the public domain; it's just bad manners to claim your little innovation is somehow so significant it demands to be patented and monetized for evermore (rather than just in the context where you came up with it).

Reply Parent Score: 3