Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 6th Sep 2011 21:57 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless In the US wireless market, AT&T is currently attempting to buy T-Mobile to create one heck of a behemoth wireless provider. While earlier this week the US government already filed a lawsuit to block the merger, citing antitrust concerns, US carrier Sprint has now also filed a lawsuit to block the merger.
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Regional companies
by jack_perry on Wed 7th Sep 2011 00:11 UTC
jack_perry
Member since:
2005-07-06

I find it amazing that the large American wireless market only has four nationwide players. ...how on earth does a huge market like the US cope?


Loads and loads of regional players (Cellular South, for example), and lots of prepaid players (TracFone, a subsidiary of a Mexican company).

Reply Score: 2

RE: Regional companies
by dsmogor on Wed 7th Sep 2011 09:24 in reply to "Regional companies"
dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

Then, the only thing the Govt should do is to regulate max roaming fees not unlike EU have done and the lack of nationwides becomes a nonissue.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Regional companies
by Yoko_T on Wed 7th Sep 2011 09:58 in reply to "RE: Regional companies"
Yoko_T Member since:
2011-08-18

Then, the only thing the Govt should do is to regulate max roaming fees not unlike EU have done and the lack of nationwides becomes a nonissue.


??? My Tracfone has 0 roaming fees...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Regional companies
by wocowboy on Wed 7th Sep 2011 10:39 in reply to "Regional companies"
wocowboy Member since:
2006-06-01

The 4 major companies refuse to provide service outside the major metropolitan areas, saying they are not profitable, not enough customers, etc, blah blah. But judging from the number of regional companies that have stepped up and made the investment to provide service in those areas, that rationale has proven to be completely untrue. Virtually the entire land area is covered by these regional providers, but the problem is in the patchwork of roaming agreements between them and the majors. Most are extremely one-sided or only allow voice and text roaming, no internet or data service at all despite both companies having 3G or LTE in the covered areas. This requires people who don't live in the major cities to usually have to have two phones; one to use in the big city that will work on 3G or 4G/LTE and one to use at their small town on its 3G system.

Reply Parent Score: 2