Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Sep 2011 19:45 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Mozilla & Gecko clones Mozilla has released Firefox 7. Unlike releases of Firefox 5 and Firefox 6 which were relatively minor upgrades to the browser, Firefox 7 includes a number of significant improvements, most important of which is probably the drastically reduced memory usage.
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End the inflated versioning!
by cmost on Wed 28th Sep 2011 00:47 UTC
cmost
Member since:
2006-07-16

I'm with a lot of users who think these inflated version numbers are absurd. In a few years, we'll be testing Firefox 400 and wondering, WTF!?!? I admire other FOSS projects like Inkscape whose community are conservative with their version numbers because they realize that the code simply isn't mature enough to warrant boundless point releases. It's a mistake to believe that increasing a version number for the sake of version numbers is wise. All it accomplishes is leading users down a disappointing path where they quickly lose faith in the project when expectations don't coincide with reality.

Reply Score: 5

RE: End the inflated versioning!
by lemur2 on Wed 28th Sep 2011 01:27 in reply to "End the inflated versioning!"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'm with a lot of users who think these inflated version numbers are absurd. In a few years, we'll be testing Firefox 400 and wondering, WTF!?!? I admire other FOSS projects like Inkscape whose community are conservative with their version numbers because they realize that the code simply isn't mature enough to warrant boundless point releases. It's a mistake to believe that increasing a version number for the sake of version numbers is wise. All it accomplishes is leading users down a disappointing path where they quickly lose faith in the project when expectations don't coincide with reality.


Chrome has far higher version number than Firefox, and a more rapid release cycle.

Mozilla OTOH has proposed: Extended Support Release.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20109245-264/mozilla-proposes-not...

Under the proposal, Mozilla would issue a new Extended Support Release (ESR) version of Firefox every 30 weeks. That's five times slower than the new rapid-release cycle for regular Firefox, which updates the browser every six weeks. And each version would be supported for 42 weeks under the proposal.

With the ESR proposal, Mozilla is trying to have it both ways, modernizing its development process without abandoning slower-moving customers. If it moves too slowly, it risks losing its edge with early adopters who already have found Google's Chrome appealing. If it moves too fast, it risks driving slower-moving organizations into the arms of Microsoft's Internet Explorer.

The company, while trying to accommodate the slower-moving customers without having to spin up a huge new support operation, is as convinced as ever that the rapid-release program is the best way forward.


This proposal addresses your faux-issue whilst still allowing a rapid development cycle.

Enjoy.

Reply Parent Score: 4

42 Weeks only?
by shotsman on Wed 28th Sep 2011 05:20 in reply to "RE: End the inflated versioning!"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

A Long term, sorry extended support release should have at least a 2 year lifespan.

Ok, I know that 42 is the answer to life etc but obviously someone at Mozilla thinks that life is too short. And, by a long way.

Reply Parent Score: 2