Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 5th Oct 2011 20:36 UTC, submitted by zizban
BeOS & Derivatives Oh gosh, finally news that's got nothing to do with patents or smartphones or the comparing of male sexual organs. Haiku news! Michael Lotz has added preliminary support for WPA to Haiku, taking the first steps towards making the Haiku wireless stack a lot more useful.
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Comment by peteo
by peteo on Wed 5th Oct 2011 22:09 UTC
peteo
Member since:
2011-10-05

Haiku makes me a sad potato.

I used BeOS R5 professionally for years, and I really enjoyed both the OS in itself, and the kit api's. So when Haiku started up years ago, I was really happy to see a BeOS clone happening.

But now, 10 years later, it's still a LONG way from being finished, and it's now a hopelessly dated OS in so many ways, which will be even more true 10 years from now when it's presumably reached 1.0.

As a hobby OS developer myself I can totally appreciate the enormous amount of work involved. Alas, with todays extremely fast advances in hardware, useful OS's is not in the realm of small projects and tiny means.

Haiku would be a neat OS. In 1998.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by peteo
by churlish_Helmut on Wed 5th Oct 2011 22:23 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
churlish_Helmut Member since:
2010-04-12

... And Haiku will become a great OS. Sooner or later :p

Really... i never used Beos or Zeta or whatever.
But first time i used Haiku, it got an Place in my heart somehow, because it is some fine OS...

I mean, this is my only opinion, but you know: Its cheaper than Windows, nicer than Mac OS, and more useful (on the desktop) than Linux... and that by now. So the last years were really good invested.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by peteo
by peteo on Wed 5th Oct 2011 22:35 in reply to "RE: Comment by peteo"
peteo Member since:
2011-10-05

Its cheaper than Windows, nicer than Mac OS, and more useful (on the desktop) than Linux....



Well, that's the problem. Windows ships with every PC (so essensially "free"), Mac OS X is certainly nicer than Haiku and - let's face it - Haiku is NOT currently more useful than Linux on the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: Comment by peteo
by v_bobok on Wed 5th Oct 2011 23:10 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

Haiku would be a neat OS. In 1998.


You seem upset...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by peteo
by Earl C Pottinger on Thu 6th Oct 2011 02:30 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
Earl C Pottinger Member since:
2008-07-12

How is it dated?

Using Windows 7 or Macs I feel like the OS is fighting me at times, sometimes to the point that it does the opposite of what I want/expect.

Example, under Windows 7 and using Google I had problem saving some pages, the html files end up being saved as tmp files. But if you force them to open with a browser you can still read them.

Trying to tell the OS to open with browser must be ten times harder than under Haiku-OS.

Edited 2011-10-06 02:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by peteo
by BluenoseJake on Thu 6th Oct 2011 21:08 in reply to "RE: Comment by peteo"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

You're blaming Windows for your own incompetence. Did you even think of renaming those files? Do you mean by "using Google" that you saved those files with Chrome? Wouldn't that be a problem with Chrome? Windows thinks that .tmp files are temporary files, and they are.

I don't think the OS is fighting you. Seems more likely you're looking for reasons to dislike Windows, instead of solutions for your problems.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by peteo
by Valhalla on Thu 6th Oct 2011 06:16 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

and it's now a hopelessly dated OS in so many ways,

Hopelessly, really? What are these amazing desktop OS developments which Haiku is hopelessly behind on?

Alas, with todays extremely fast advances in hardware, useful OS's is not in the realm of small projects and tiny means.

Extremely fast advances in hardware? Haiku is x86 only and yet it can run on modern cpu's from intel and amd. Opposite to your statement I see more and more consolidation rather than variety in hardware which means that there is less and less hardware you need to support. Note that I am talking about the desktop here, which is what Haiku is targeting.

Hardware accelerated 2d/3d graphics is certainly lacking, however this will likely be solved with gallium eventually.

I'd say software is Haiku's largest achilles heel. Not only is native software is extremely scarce but there's not a whole lot of ports for anything other than games. That is NOT an unsurmountable obstacle though as there is nothing technical preventing Haiku from enjoying ports of strong open source applications, just the lack of time/know-how amongst current porters. Applications like full-fledged browsers (Firefox/Chrome), productivity apps like LibreOffice, Abiword, Inkscape, etc. would quickly make Haiku alot more viable for day to day use.

Hopefully Haiku will attract more developers as users as that will likely pay off when it comes to Haiku's software repertoire, which also (I hope) means native software as it has a better chance of highlighting Haiku's strengths.

Haiku would be a neat OS. In 1998.

Yes, and it will be a neat OS in 2012 aswell.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by peteo
by Ventajou on Thu 6th Oct 2011 06:28 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
Ventajou Member since:
2006-10-31

Linux seemed pretty crappy a few years back and yet look where it is now. I think what Haiku needs most right now is developers so why not help them?

Haiku is the one open source project I'd love to contribute to if I had the time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by peteo
by TheGreatSudoku on Thu 6th Oct 2011 15:58 in reply to "Comment by peteo"
TheGreatSudoku Member since:
2009-07-28

I agree with Peteo. I LOVED BeOS in the R5 days, it was a windows-alternative that worked WONDERFULLY out-of-the-box. At the time Linux still required editing Xfree86 conf files to get something graphical. BeOS was user friendly and lightning fast.

I too am saddened by the length of time it has taken to get even an Alpha release of Haiku out. In the decade plus Haiku has been in development, Linux has made some great inroads in terms of user-friendliness. Nowadays there's a GUI for everything in Linux, you really have to go searching for a distro that caters to hand editing config files (Slackware, Arch, etc.).

It's nice to see progress being made on Haiku, even if it does seem to be 5 years behind the times. What interests me is how INNOVATIVE and BETTER BeOS was than its competitors back in the day. Once Haiku R1 is officially released, I'll be EXTREMELY interested to see if that spirit of innovation and doing things better is carried on by the Haiku project.

Hopefully the process of Haiku playing catch-up won't last much longer. I'd much more interested in seeing BeOS evolve than simply be re-born.

Reply Parent Score: 1