Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Nov 2011 23:17 UTC
Fedora Core Good news from the Linux world. Fedora has announced its intention to drastically alter the file system layout of its Linux distribution. The plan's been out for a while, but was brought to my attention by Brian Proffitt (still the best name ever) over at ITWorld. The gist is to move all binaries to /usr/bin, and all libraries to /usr/lib and /user/lib64.
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Giving up on recovery
by malxau on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 00:07 UTC
malxau
Member since:
2005-12-04

It makes sense in the context that Fedora requires /usr to be populated in order to boot today, but the whole point of a separate /usr is to enable the system to boot and be repaired without depending on all of the "applications" to be available.

Root could be small, readonly, and always there as a failsafe. Becoming more monolithic really makes it harder to recover when things go wrong - if your openoffice install corrupts some part of the filesystem tree, you'll need more dramatic recovery options (eg. boot from CD/DVD.)

Reply Score: 8

RE: Giving up on recovery
by Delgarde on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 01:07 in reply to "Giving up on recovery"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Root could be small, readonly, and always there as a failsafe.


These days, we call that "initramfs". Because if you already have a small readonly version of the system that's sophisticated enough to mount root from a network filesystem or an encrypted device, there's not much value in the separate root device at all...

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Giving up on recovery
by sorpigal on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 11:40 in reply to "RE: Giving up on recovery"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Is initramfs required to boot? Last I knew, it wasn't.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Giving up on recovery
by foregam on Thu 3rd Nov 2011 11:39 in reply to "Giving up on recovery"
foregam Member since:
2010-11-17

[...] the whole point of a separate /usr is to enable the system to boot and be repaired without depending on all of the "applications" to be available.

Root could be small, readonly, and always there as a failsafe. [...]


My feelings exactly. The result of moving /bin and /sbin to /usr will be a major clusterfuck. The OS graveyard is full of Unices which did that. Think HP-UX. Oh, and it will make mounting /usr from NFS even more nightmarish than it is now. So I say first implement union directories a la Plan 9 (aufs is fine but doesn't come anywhere close to that) and improve u9fs, and then screw with the filesystem layout as much as you wish.

Reply Parent Score: 2