Linked by fran on Sat 24th Dec 2011 10:08 UTC
Windows "The new Windows PowerShell is coming. Actually, Microsoft has just launched a Community Technology Preview of Windows PowerShell version 3, although the final version 3 probably won’t ship until it comes out with Windows 8. It also will be available for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. The CTP will install on those OSes."
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Window shell width
by Sodki on Sat 24th Dec 2011 11:29 UTC
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

Can we maximize PowerShell's window yet? It irritates me to no end that in this day and age the maximum width of the cmd window is 90 and the maximum width of the PowerShell window is 120. How amazingly stupid of them! What kind of architecture does PowerShell have that doesn't allow to fully maximize it's window?

None of the unix shells have that problem, of course.

Reply Score: 6

RE: Window shell width
by OSGuy on Sat 24th Dec 2011 12:52 in reply to "Window shell width"
OSGuy Member since:
2006-01-01

You can adjust the window width by clicking the window icon on the top left corner and then click the Layout tab and then Window Size (as well as Buffer Size). For Window Size you have Width and Height. To save these settings permanently, create a shortcut of PowerShell to your desktop and right click and then Properties and again go to Layout. I set mine's width to 160 (on the shortcut) and when I maximize it fully maximizes, you just need to also need to tweak its height a bit. Try 160 by 58.

Edited 2011-12-24 12:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Window shell width
by pgeorgi on Sat 24th Dec 2011 16:10 in reply to "RE: Window shell width"
pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

also, "mode con: cols=160 lines=3000"

Bonus points for using powershell for determining resolution and font size to calculate the number of columns (lines are automatically scrollbar'd, making it easy to just pick a large number)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Window shell width
by Soulbender on Sun 25th Dec 2011 10:20 in reply to "RE: Window shell width"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Wow, that's smooth. Not. Why can't you just resize the window? (Ok, I actually know why, it's because the Windows console APi sucks balls)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Window shell width
by boxy on Sat 24th Dec 2011 19:43 in reply to "Window shell width"
boxy Member since:
2011-06-20

Can we maximize PowerShell's window yet? It irritates me to no end that in this day and age...


Indeed it is unfortunate that the maximize button on the console host doesn't actually maximize in both the horizontal and vertical directions. This is not the fault of PowerShell, though, but of the console host that it runs inside. The same host is used for cmd.exe.

In fact this is so retarded that Scott Hanselman, a Microsoft employee, recommends installing a third party console host. Full article here:

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/Console2ABetterWindowsCommandPrompt.a...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Window shell width
by f0dder on Sun 25th Dec 2011 15:12 in reply to "RE: Window shell width"
f0dder Member since:
2009-08-05

Console2 is great, but...

1) try running multiple tabs and killing one of it's spawned processes.
2) try running some "full screen textmode" programs (ie, those using the console API rather than just writing stdout).

I'm afraid there's no simple way to get it working perfectly... the Win32 console API was written for speed, backward compatibility and to be similar to hardware PC text video modes, not for flexible goodness :/

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Window shell width
by andih on Sun 25th Dec 2011 01:44 in reply to "Window shell width"
andih Member since:
2010-03-27

Talked to a couple of diehard-windows-pros the other day, and one said:
"Almost no one actually *learn* powershell. Most people, even pros, just copy and paste from the web"


A huge contrast to *nix, where people learn to master their shells, and use them for anything and everything.

e.g. I use bash terminal as my only file-manager.. I fire up thunar on some rare occasions where thumbnails are needed, but have found that bash is almost always faster and more effective than GUI, if one know how to use it.
I believe that this is not the case for powerhell.

on nix we have loads of excellent text editors and powerful tools for command line:) That's partly what makes it so powerful.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Ahh, the Unix geek arrogance.
by MollyC on Sun 25th Dec 2011 02:20 in reply to "RE: Window shell width"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

Always so charming.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Window shell width
by WorknMan on Sun 25th Dec 2011 03:33 in reply to "RE: Window shell width"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

e.g. I use bash terminal as my only file-manager.. I fire up thunar on some rare occasions where thumbnails are needed, but have found that bash is almost always faster and more effective than GUI, if one know how to use it.


That's because you guys have shitty file managers on *nix, and I wouldn't use them either. But if you ever spent any serious time with Directory Opus on Windows, you'd never make this claim:

http://reviewlagoon.com/viewarticle.php?articleID=50

Of course, if you wouldn't pay for a quality text editor, you'd never pay for a quality file manager either, especially not for what they're charging for it. Note: I don't want to get into a CLI vs GUI pissing contest here, as I use both; I just find it humorous when somebody on a platform full of bad file managers talks about how much file managers suck.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Window shell width
by n4cer on Sun 25th Dec 2011 14:35 in reply to "Window shell width"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

Can we maximize PowerShell's window yet? It irritates me to no end that in this day and age the maximum width of the cmd window is 90 and the maximum width of the PowerShell window is 120. How amazingly stupid of them! What kind of architecture does PowerShell have that doesn't allow to fully maximize it's window?

None of the unix shells have that problem, of course.


Others have pointed out ways of doing this for the console host.

You can also run the ISE, powershell_ise.exe, with the bonus of having Intellisense and other editing features from Visual Studio. It supports custom profiles as well, just as the console environment does, and has an object model ($psise) you may use to customize its appearance/behavior.

The TechNet article barely touches on what's new in v3, but does link to the PowerShell blog ( http://blogs.msdn.com/b/powershell/archive/2011/09/20/windows-manag... ) which is a better source of info.

http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-646T

and

http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/SAC-644T

is also good.

Related:
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/?sort=sequential&di...

Edited 2011-12-25 14:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2