Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Dec 2011 21:50 UTC
Windows Fascinating, this. As a Windows Phone 7 user, I can attest that it is every bit as good as iOS and Android - heck, in my experience, it is more polished, more consistent, smoother, and faster than either of those two. Yet, despite raving reviews and glowing user comments all over the web, Windows Phone 7 simply isn't selling. Former Windows Phone 7 general manager Charlie Kindel believes it's because neither carriers nor device makers like the control Microsoft exerts over the platform.
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RE[2]: Not every bit as good.
by leos on Wed 28th Dec 2011 00:38 UTC in reply to "RE: Not every bit as good."
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

As far as apps go, WP7 already has lots of them, so .NET is not an issue for the developers and customers won't care as long as their favorite apps are available.


Yes there are "lots", but there are some very significant missing players like Skype. That's a direct result of Microsoft "my way or the highway" approach to development that makes it pretty difficult for Skype to bring something to the platform in a reasonable timeframe.

Apple got away with that approach for a long time and even they softened their stance eventually to allow other frameworks and languages to target iOS. Funny how Microsoft didn't learn anything from the history of iOS or Android.

Reply Parent Score: 5

jackeebleu Member since:
2006-01-26

Um, you do realize that Microsoft owns Skype right? And its only a matter of time that Skype runs native on WP7....right?

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2011/may11/05-10corpnewspr...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Not every bit as good.
by leos on Thu 29th Dec 2011 02:32 in reply to "RE[3]: Not every bit as good."
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Um, you do realize that Microsoft owns Skype right? And its only a matter of time that Skype runs native on WP7....right?


Eventually, eventually. Eventually I will be able to beam myself to china instead of flying there. Not exactly relevant if I can't do it now.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Not every bit as good.
by n4cer on Wed 28th Dec 2011 03:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Not every bit as good."
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

"As far as apps go, WP7 already has lots of them, so .NET is not an issue for the developers and customers won't care as long as their favorite apps are available.


Yes there are "lots", but there are some very significant missing players like Skype. That's a direct result of Microsoft "my way or the highway" approach to development that makes it pretty difficult for Skype to bring something to the platform in a reasonable timeframe.

Apple got away with that approach for a long time and even they softened their stance eventually to allow other frameworks and languages to target iOS. Funny how Microsoft didn't learn anything from the history of iOS or Android.
"

Major ISVs like Skype could potentially get a waiver enabling them to use unmanaged code, however, while Skype would've needed such a waiver for 7.0 due to the lack of managed APIs for required functionality, it probably would not for 7.5 (Mango) unless Skype just didn't want to do a version in managed code.

Skype is a bad example though because the delay in bringing it to the WP platform is because it is due to be integrated into the platform, similar to how messaging is handled in Mango.

While I'm personally a proponent of restricting the API to .NET, it appears increasingly likely that MS is working on an unmanaged API based on WinRT.

As far as learning from Android, MS purposely tried to avoid that since they have the history of Windows Mobile from which to learn. They've already been through non-uniform updates, OEMs and carriers producing devices with subpar specs or custom UIs, or preloading crapware, the ability to bog down your device by giving apps free reign -- altogether contributing to poor user experience and brand erosion. It's something they didn't want to repeat.

Edited 2011-12-28 03:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3