Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 13th Jan 2012 16:20 UTC, submitted by moondevil
Windows And so the war on general computing continues. Were you looking forward to ARM laptops and maybe even desktops now that Windows 8 will also be released for ARM? I personally was, because I'd much rather have a thin, but fast and economical machine than a beastly Intel PC. Sadly, it turns out that all our fears regarding UEFI's Secure Boot feature were justified: Microsoft prohibits OEMs from allowing you to install anything other than Windows 8 on ARM devices (the Software Freedom Law Center has more).
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"Reuse. I often fix other people's computers for them, recently I've been able to convince a number of them to give Fedora + KDE a try as I'm able to promise them a virus free lifestyle computer that can surf the web and do basic office tasks.


Oh great you give them an OS that is unsupported after a year ... brilliant!

While I might agree on the fact that if most people are just using Facebook and checking emails that is alright. But the moment they want to connect iPods, mobile phones, use third party services like Spotify they are SOL.

I don't want to have a go at you too much because I think you are alright.
"

In my country, today, I can buy an ARM netbook and run Linux on it quite happily:

http://www.pioneercomputers.com.au/products/configure.asp?c1=3&c2=1...

Although the OEM offers either WinCE or Android pre-installed, there is no reason why I couldn't run say Debian for ARM with KDE if I want to.

Contrary to your assumption, I would have absolutely no trouble connecting to iPods or iPhones if I happened to own any.

http://www.libimobiledevice.org/

As for Spotify, it is simply not available in Australia.

Reply Parent Score: 4

bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

lemur2 posted....

In my country, today, I can buy an ARM netbook and run Linux on it quite happily:

http://www.pioneercomputers.com.au/products/configure.asp?c1=3&...

Although the OEM offers either WinCE or Android pre-installed, there is no reason why I couldn't run say Debian for ARM with KDE if I want to.


Awesome! Unfortunately the shipping from Australia to the US knocks in an additional 149 AUD making my total $359.171 USD according to conversions done by XE.com.. ;)

Still because I remember you from the BeOS days (you were the PhOS guy, weren't you?) I have to ask--how does running one of those "Dreambooks with a Linux distro handle? I figure you're probably the guy to ask.

--bornagainpengui

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

lemur2 posted....
"In my country, today, I can buy an ARM netbook and run Linux on it quite happily:

http://www.pioneercomputers.com.au/products/configure.asp?c1=3&c2=1...

Although the OEM offers either WinCE or Android pre-installed, there is no reason why I couldn't run say Debian for ARM with KDE if I want to.


Awesome! Unfortunately the shipping from Australia to the US knocks in an additional 149 AUD making my total $359.171 USD according to conversions done by XE.com.. ;)

Still because I remember you from the BeOS days (you were the PhOS guy, weren't you?) I have to ask--how does running one of those "Dreambooks with a Linux distro handle? I figure you're probably the guy to ask.

--bornagainpengui
"

Sorry, but I'm not the BeOS guy, and I don't own an ARM netbook. The netbook I do own is an Acer Aspire One 522, which uses an AMD Fusion C50 APU. I got this one only because it was one of a very limited choice available to me, as an award.

Even though this netbook came with Windows 7 starter, I am running Kubuntu Precise Pangolin Aplha on in right now as I type this, and so I am significantly better off. Since I am the owner of the hardware, the fact that I can do so is they way it should be, IMO.

Edited 2012-01-14 03:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1