Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 29th Apr 2012 20:28 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives "During the coding period, I will first work on the boot loader. I intend to modify the existing x86 boot loader so that it is capable of loading both a 32-bit Haiku kernel and a 64-bit one. Once this is done, I will work on implementing the x86_64 architecture functionality in the kernel. Finally, I will port modules and drivers to the 64-bit kernel. Should I have time, I will also begin work on porting userland." Heck. Yes.
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RE: Cool, but...
by drcouzelis on Mon 30th Apr 2012 01:17 UTC in reply to "Cool, but..."
drcouzelis
Member since:
2010-01-11

I know what you mean. I'm an active Haiku user and have it installed on my hard drive. I suppose the reason I'm not so excited about the 64 bit port is that, after all of the (amazing) work that will be done on it, when I install it, it won't feel any different than when I was using the 32 bit version.

Compare that to, say, a hypothetical GSoC project to update the GoBe Productive source code for Haiku. ;)

Edited 2012-04-30 01:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Cool, but...
by Morgan on Mon 30th Apr 2012 01:26 in reply to "RE: Cool, but..."
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I'm excited about it because Haiku needs to face forward, not hold on to the past. I realize it is a resurrection of a long-dead OS and needs the backward compatibility for the R1 release, but looking forward I feel it will have much more momentum if there is a 64 bit option.

I also hope this move will push app developers to take the platform seriously, and start porting over the good stuff. I've never been an app-paradigm fan, but I have enough common sense to realize that developers in general are focused on apps and that's where the activity is.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Cool, but...
by Narishma on Mon 30th Apr 2012 02:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Cool, but..."
Narishma Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm excited about it because Haiku needs to face forward, not hold on to the past. I realize it is a resurrection of a long-dead OS and needs the backward compatibility for the R1 release, but looking forward I feel it will have much more momentum if there is a 64 bit option.

I also hope this move will push app developers to take the platform seriously, and start porting over the good stuff. I've never been an app-paradigm fan, but I have enough common sense to realize that developers in general are focused on apps and that's where the activity is.

I'm not sure I understand your point. In what way will having a 64-bit version push developers to port their applications?
Like a few people above, I don't get why people are excited about this.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Cool, but...
by earksiinni on Mon 30th Apr 2012 02:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Cool, but..."
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

but looking forward I feel it will have much more momentum if there is a 64 bit option.


This makes sense. (Not sarcastic.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Cool, but...
by v_bobok on Wed 2nd May 2012 00:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Cool, but..."
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

Personally I don't care about binary compatibility anymore. I'd use newly ported Qt stuff along with new native bits anyway, since most of the old software is very outdated.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Cool, but...
by Earl C Pottinger on Mon 30th Apr 2012 04:51 in reply to "RE: Cool, but..."
Earl C Pottinger Member since:
2008-07-12

Haiku is so fast that I doubt you will notice much change in the speed of the operation of the OS.

However, I do have a program that I need to get running to process a 136GB drive image, making such code work in Haiku's 2GB user space is a pain. I am doing a lot of paging (my own paging system with 16MB pages) that moving to a system with a larger user space will help a lot for example why a 64-bit OS would be handy.

Reply Parent Score: 1