Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th May 2012 22:49 UTC
Windows For weeks - if not months - I've been trying to come up with a way to succinctly and accurately explain why, exactly, Windows 8 rubs me the wrong way, usability-wise. I think I finally got it.
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RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by Brendan on Tue 15th May 2012 07:44 UTC in reply to "RE: Desktop/Laptop Users"
Brendan
Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

Microsft has stated that they think that within a couple of years it will be hard to buy a computer without a touch screen display, so that's what they're going with. I agree that those without touch screens might be best off staying with Windows 7 until time comes for them to get a new computer.


Regardless of whether the screen is a touch screen or not; desktop users will never want to use touch. In terms of ergonomics, it's a massive disaster unless the screen is tiny (e.g. small enough to allow you to touch anywhere on the screen while holding the screen in your hands).

See how long you can make your hands hover in front of a large vertical surface, or hover above a large horizontal surface, before your arms get tired. Make sure you don't accidentally touch the surface (e.g. rest your wrist on the screen, send a bunch of files to the recycle bin because your shirt sleeve was dragging, etc). Now imagine trying to do "hover hands" for 8+ hours per day.

- Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by ricegf on Tue 15th May 2012 12:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

See how long you can make your hands hover in front of a large vertical surface


Um, why vertical? When I use my iPad, it's reclined at about a 20 degree angle, and it's quite comfortable to move things around with my hands directly. Why wouldn't a 30" flatscreen monitor be similarly inclined and manipulated directly rather than using a mouse?

Of course, it must have a keyboard. I can't imagine an office environment where everyone is constantly talking to their computers. It would drive me to distraction...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by WereCatf on Tue 15th May 2012 12:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Desktop/Laptop Users"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Why wouldn't a 30" flatscreen monitor be similarly inclined and manipulated directly rather than using a mouse?


Because there is often a keyboard and various kinds of paper or other objects in the way, meaning that you'll still end up reaching out and tiring your arm.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by redshift on Wed 16th May 2012 01:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Desktop/Laptop Users"
redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

Um, why vertical? When I use my iPad, it's reclined at about a 20 degree angle, and it's quite comfortable to move things around with my hands directly. Why wouldn't a 30" flatscreen monitor be similarly inclined and manipulated directly rather than using a mouse?


Because now the top of it is 30" away and everything is in perspective. Your eye compensates for this much better with a small device. Just tilt your monitor back an pretend it is a touch screen. That is not ergonomic at all.

Touch screens have been around for quite a while... but they only caught on when they could fit elegantly in your hand. Why do you think that is?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by contextfree on Wed 16th May 2012 12:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users"
contextfree Member since:
2009-06-01

Having another input method available doesn't mean you have to use it 8 hours a day. You have a combination of input methods (touch, mouse, keyboard, speech, pen, gestures, etc.) and you use whichever one or ones feel appropriate and natural at any given time. If a particular posture starts to get tiring you can change postures.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Desktop/Laptop Users
by zima on Mon 21st May 2012 23:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Desktop/Laptop Users"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

In terms of ergonomics, it's a massive disaster unless the screen is tiny (e.g. small enough to allow you to touch anywhere on the screen while holding the screen in your hands).
See how long you can make your hands hover in front of a large vertical surface, or hover above a large horizontal surface, before your arms get tired. Make sure you don't accidentally touch the surface (e.g. rest your wrist on the screen, send a bunch of files to the recycle bin because your shirt sleeve was dragging, etc)

That didn't seem as much of a problem with large pre-CAD drawing boards (which can be also inclined). And don't dismiss the possibility of software which is able to differentiate "arms resting" from purposeful actions.

Reply Parent Score: 2