Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 3rd Jun 2012 22:04 UTC
Windows So, I've been using the Windows 8 Release Preview since it came out, almost exclusively (except for work, since I'm obviously not going to rely on unfinished and untested software for that). I already knew I could get into Metro on my 11.6" ZenBook, but on my 24" desktop, things aren't looking as rosy. Here's an illustrated guide of the most pressing issues I run into, and five suggestions to address them. Instead of just complaining, let's get constructive.
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RE[9]: Unaddressed
by OMRebel on Wed 6th Jun 2012 21:15 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Unaddressed"
OMRebel
Member since:
2005-11-14

@Nelson

I think we shall just agree to disagree on this one. From my viewpoint (and I think this is where the difference comes into play) is based on the following two key issues:

1. IT IS COMMONLY ACCEPTED AMONG PRETTY MUCH EVERYONE THAT WORDS IN ALL CAPITALIZED LETTERS MAKE READING MORE DIFFICULT. THERE ARE OTHER WAYS TO PLACE EMPHASIS ON WORDS RATHER THAN RESORTING TO SOMETHING THAT TRULY IS A "NO NO" TO DO IN DESIGN. I AM GLAD THAT THE OPTION IS THERE TO TOGGLE THE CAPITALIZATION IN ORDER TO TURN IT OFF - because that simply makes it easier to read and isn't such a sore site for the eyes. Yet, for MS to default the setting to all caps is rather absurd to be honest.

2. If you look at the top of the menu (and pretty much in other areas of the UI), it's all blended together. Now, I am assuming there will be the possibility to add themes and such. But, as it stands by default, it's really bland and depressing to look at.

I asked my coworkers (who are developers as well) their thoughts without letting them know my impression, and every single one had the same opinion as I did. Now, I am assuming MS did what they did due to a move to changing the UI to be more in line with Metro - which is a mistake. As a developer, I won't use Metro. On my two screens here at work, I have VS2010 open on one screen, and multiple windows opened on another. Keep in mind, not all shops are writing strictly ASP.NET applications and such. Many are still using Winforms, WPFs, etc.... With some of our applications, it's important that I am able to have a DOS window open, an explorer window, and usually examining some text files as well (I know, legacy products suck - but gotta pay the bills!).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Unaddressed
by Nelson on Wed 6th Jun 2012 21:25 in reply to "RE[9]: Unaddressed"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


I think we shall just agree to disagree on this one. From my viewpoint (and I think this is where the difference comes into play) is based on the following two key issues:


Perfect, I have no problem doing so ;)


1. IT IS COMMONLY ACCEPTED AMONG PRETTY MUCH EVERYONE THAT WORDS IN ALL CAPITALIZED LETTERS MAKE READING MORE DIFFICULT. THERE ARE OTHER WAYS TO PLACE EMPHASIS ON WORDS RATHER THAN RESORTING TO SOMETHING THAT TRULY IS A "NO NO" TO DO IN DESIGN. I AM GLAD THAT THE OPTION IS THERE TO TOGGLE THE CAPITALIZATION IN ORDER TO TURN IT OFF - because that simply makes it easier to read and isn't such a sore site for the eyes. Yet, for MS to default the setting to all caps is rather absurd to be honest.


I'm not entirely sold on their reasoning, but it doesn't exactly bother me either. If they turned them off by default, or outright uncapped them all together it wouldn't kill me.


2. If you look at the top of the menu (and pretty much in other areas of the UI), it's all blended together. Now, I am assuming there will be the possibility to add themes and such. But, as it stands by default, it's really bland and depressing to look at.


Do you agree with my sentiment on the icons though? I think they stand out a hell of a lot better than the VS2010 (or 08) ones. I spend less time scanning a sea of icons.


I asked my coworkers (who are developers as well) their thoughts without letting them know my impression, and every single one had the same opinion as I did. Now, I am assuming MS did what they did due to a move to changing the UI to be more in line with Metro - which is a mistake.


Their reasoning (I don't know if you've read the blog) is to emphasize focus on the content and minimize the "noise" of the UI. Stark colors and gradients are sometimes distracting. I don't know how true it is, but I happen to like Metro, and I love (colors aside) how they've streamlined and simplified the menus. I have way more vertical space now.


As a developer, I won't use Metro. On my two screens here at work, I have VS2010 open on one screen, and multiple windows opened on another. Keep in mind, not all shops are writing strictly ASP.NET applications and such. Many are still using Winforms, WPFs, etc....


I hope no shops write ASP.NET, I think it's overengineered bullshit ;P .


With some of our applications, it's important that I am able to have a DOS window open, an explorer window, and usually examining some text files as well (I know, legacy products suck - but gotta pay the bills!).


I'm still able to do this in VS2012 and on Windows 8. You're thrown into Desktop Mode anyway with VS2012, so the ability to tear panes off of Visual Studio and pin them to individual monitors and all that good stuff is still there.

Plus, Windows 8 has some neat multi-mon improvements which help my dev workflow quite a bit.

Do you think any of this is made harder or diminished in Win8?

Great discussion though, forgive my initial abrasive attitude, it's not common to have a reasonable discussion.

Reply Parent Score: 2