Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Jun 2012 02:49 UTC
Apple After a proper teardown, iFixit concludes that the new MacBook Pro has no user-serviceable parts at all, which some think is a really bad thing. I honestly don't know - I mean, my ZenBook isn't particularly user-serviceable either, and my smartphones, tablets, and whatnot are pretty much entirely soldered together as well. What do you guys make of this?
Thread beginning with comment 521978
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Sounds like a challenge.
by rexstuff on Thu 14th Jun 2012 06:50 UTC
rexstuff
Member since:
2007-04-06

Pfft - I tend to view "not user serviceable" the same way I view "non-flammable": as a challenge.

I've had my 4,1 MBP apart a couple of times. I wouldn't recommend it, Apple sure doesn't make it easy, but it can be done, and I've fixed one or two things. Probably voided my warranty, but I'm sure that was dead long ago.

I pine for the old days of cars and computers, where one could be stripped down and rebuilt with nothing more than a leatherman multi-tool. There was something great about being able to service your machines yourself, a sense of independence and importance, that you really knew your machine and how you were using it.

Nowadays, you can barely change the oil in a modern car without being a liscenced mechanic; computers are headed the same way, I'm afraid.

That's what I love about my 1984 Honda motorcycle; there's nothing on there I can't fix myself, with enough time and patience ;) I have to, for that matter. Most shops won't even look at things that old anymore. How are we going to keep anything running when no-one knows how they work anymore? Are we doomed to discard and upgrade? That's what Apple would love, I'm sure.

Edited 2012-06-14 06:52 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Sounds like a challenge.
by zima on Thu 14th Jun 2012 07:55 in reply to "Sounds like a challenge."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

I pine for the old days of cars and computers, where one could be stripped down and rebuilt with nothing more than a leatherman multi-tool. There was something great about being able to service your machines yourself, a sense of independence and importance, that you really knew your machine and how you were using it.

...and about them being less efficient, more polluting, notably less reliable overall? (also without complex active safety systems, mostly in brakes; or without delicate passive safety systems that must never be triggered inadvertently - come on, there are essentially six explosive charges inside the cabin of my car, which is probably at most fairly average at that, being decade+ old; you really don't want unlicensed people messing around those)

Just saying; don't look at the past through too rosy glasses.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Less reliable is a bit of a misnomer.

I have a "unreliable" 1970s Peugeot Sports Tourer Bicycle, every maintenence job can be done via allen keys, screwdriver and a hammer.

No it isn't as fast a modern push bike, it isn't a light, but it doesn't break and nobody will steal it because it isn't worth anything.

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

I think he didn't want to say he missed the pollution or the reliability. He just said he missed the serviceability.
Pollution is a con.
Reliability is a pro.
Serviceability is a pro.
I take this macbook over a 486DX2-33 of course, but if there was 2 models with same look, same price, same content, one serviceable and the other not,only an idiot would take the inferior model.
I think what he meant was that there has been a regression in that area.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Sounds like a challenge.
by rexstuff on Thu 14th Jun 2012 22:37 in reply to "RE: Sounds like a challenge."
rexstuff Member since:
2007-04-06

I am not so sure that those are mutually exclusive.

Yes, in addition to being faster, lighter, stronger, etc, we lost the ability to do the service ourselves, but I'm not sure that that has to be the case.

Why can't we build a car or computer that is user-serviceable while still making use of the modern engineering that gave us these benefits?

For instance, I may not be able to repair an EFI module the same way I could a carbuerrator, granted, but why can't I replace it?

A modern car with user serviceability in mind may not be quite as fast or efficient or even as cheap, but I wonder if there wouldn't be a market for it...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Sounds like a challenge.
by bert64 on Sat 16th Jun 2012 09:16 in reply to "Sounds like a challenge."
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

The only difficulty with cars, is that you need specialist equipment and plenty of space for some things like removing the engine...

Anyone could dismantle a computer with little more than a screwdriver, so it is much easier to get into.

Reply Parent Score: 2