Linked by Elv13 on Sun 17th Jun 2012 10:35 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "The UEFI secure boot mechanism has been the source of a great deal of concern in the free software community, and for good reason: it could easily be a mechanism by which we lose control over our own systems. Recently, Red Hat's Matthew Garrett described how the Fedora distribution planned to handle secure boot in the Fedora 18 release. That posting has inspired a great deal of concern and criticism, though, arguably, about the wrong things."
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Yoko_T
Member since:
2011-08-18

(didn;t read the post above me till after I posted, he makes some good points, except for his dislike of Metro, which I feel will integrate well with my entire set of devices including the xbox and such, plus I think they are looking to the future and realizing that the desktop is not going to be around in 10 years or so)
MS doesn't make the bios, the company your looking for is pheonix or the like. They currently do not pay anyone to make bios's. They have a deal set for Pheonix to secure it. Doing this does not provide any extra jobs, but it does attempt to lock their OS in the market. As far as security, I don't know how much more secure it can make it, as linux and Mac don't have secure boot, yet they are not criticized for being insecure. The disk can still be easily read from a third party, by simply writing it to another disk and then booting the other disk. Think it is more about maintaining market share. Please give me some info if I am wrong.
As for what fedora is doing, I don't think they should have done anything. I think the opensource community should have stuck together on this one and fought it as an infringement on my right to do what I want with my computer. Similar things have happened in the android and ios community. The courts ruled that we can do whatever we like with our devices, like rooting, and cannot be prevented from doing so (albeit there do exist so drawbacks such as breaking of warranty, which is understandable)


Let's be perfectly honest here. This UEFI bullshit is being inflicted on us by the same bunch of assholes within Fedora who decided to inflict the half-baked garbage known as Gnome 3 upon unsuspecting users of Fedora.

Reply Parent Score: 1

the_trapper Member since:
2005-07-07

Let's be perfectly honest here. This UEFI bullshit is being inflicted on us by the same bunch of assholes within Fedora who decided to inflict the half-baked garbage known as Gnome 3 upon unsuspecting users of Fedora.


Ummm, yeah where to begin.

See Linux is different than the other OSes you're probably used to. You hate Gnome 3? No problem, you can install MATE (Gnome 2 kept on life support), KDE, XFCE, LXDE, WindowMaker, TWM, or just hit Ctrl-Alt-F2 and start using the Linux console. So Gnome 3, it wasn't forced on you.

Also, this UEFI bullshit is being orchestrated by Microsoft. Yeah, they aren't exclusive in designing and developing it, so there certainly are a few other companies to blame there. However, Microsoft are the ones who are twisting the OEMs arms into enabling it by default.

Fedora, and by extension Red Hat are just trying to figure out how to ensure that their software continues to work on these new Windows 8 stickered computers with minimal interuptions for their users. With that being said, I, like many others, am disappointed that they decided to kowtow to Microsoft, instead of putting up a fight against this clearly anticompetitive practice.

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

In the same vein you can use Litestep, LDE(X), bbLean, Emerge Desktop on "the other OSes you're probably used to" - or just start using the Powershell. So, Explorer isn't forced on you.

Except, that's not really the case in ~corporate scenarios, where some fairly usual set of defaults does tend to be forced on users. Also when the OS is Red Hat (or its derivatives), which likely will force Gnome 3.

Reply Parent Score: 2