Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 23rd Jun 2012 20:18 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Artificial intelligence is still a long way from delivering the human intelligence in robot form that has long been common in science fiction.
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RE: AI definitions
by Fergy on Sun 24th Jun 2012 06:13 UTC in reply to "AI definitions"
Fergy
Member since:
2006-04-10

A computer game clearly can exhibit intelligence, but it's less realistic because it's on screen.

The computer characters in a game act dumber than dogs. Being on screen has nothing to do with it. Actors in a movie don't come across as dumb.
When a computer can learn a new language like a 0-6 year old child can do. When you computer understands what you are doing. When a computer can drastically improve over time without a programmer. That is when you can call it intelligent IMO.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: AI definitions
by rom508 on Sun 24th Jun 2012 07:25 in reply to "RE: AI definitions"
rom508 Member since:
2007-04-20

When a computer can drastically improve over time without a programmer. That is when you can call it intelligent IMO.


You need to look at a bigger picture. Nothing improves over time in isolation. Despite the fact that a lot of our intelligent machinery is coded in DNA (biological computer program) we still require massive amounts of input from our parents, school teachers, books, society, etc. All these external factors continually program our brains over many years. Otherwise, how do you tell the difference between good and evil, or courage and cowardice?

Complex AI is definitely possible, but will need a lot of research, development and evolution before it can overtake human intelligence.

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RE[3]: AI definitions
by allanregistos on Mon 25th Jun 2012 05:03 in reply to "RE[2]: AI definitions"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

"When a computer can drastically improve over time without a programmer. That is when you can call it intelligent IMO.


You need to look at a bigger picture. Nothing improves over time in isolation. Despite the fact that a lot of our intelligent machinery is coded in DNA (biological computer program) we still require massive amounts of input from our parents, school teachers, books, society, etc. All these external factors continually program our brains over many years. Otherwise, how do you tell the difference between good and evil, or courage and cowardice?

Complex AI is definitely possible, but will need a lot of research, development and evolution before it can overtake human intelligence.
"

I think you have nailed the idea that a man's moral code is subjective(he alone can choose of what is good) w/o any external influences or some religious moral law. This argument mostly comes from the atheists when they formulate arguments against Christianity. Just do an experiment, isolate a human being (w/o any external influences) then put him on a situation where a baby was rammed by a vehicle, and lets see what he/she will do.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: AI definitions
by zima on Sun 24th Jun 2012 09:45 in reply to "RE: AI definitions"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

When a computer can learn a new language like a 0-6 year old child can do. When you computer understands what you are doing. When a computer can drastically improve over time without a programmer. That is when you can call it intelligent IMO.

So virtually all primates cannot be called intelligent? (likewise cetaceans, cats, dogs, going through many tool-making & using birds, "down" to octopuses or even swarm intelligence of some insects)

It's a spectrum. And humans find it very hard to "drastically improve over time without a programmer" - there are enough cases of severely neglected children and effects of it, even some feral children (while most of such stories are made up, there are few rigorously documented ones, for example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_(feral_child) ).
IQ and fertility rate are inversely correlated ...might be also because of more focus each individual child can get, when there is less of them.

The computer characters in a game act dumber than dogs.

Well, when you mix some good (at being "realistic") deathmatch FPS bots with average human players, immediately telling them apart is not always so clear.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: AI definitions
by Fergy on Sun 24th Jun 2012 15:58 in reply to "RE[2]: AI definitions"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

So virtually all primates cannot be called intelligent? (likewise cetaceans, cats, dogs, going through many tool-making & using birds, "down" to octopuses or even swarm intelligence of some insects)

I am simply saying what I would expect from an intelligent AI. I am not talking about other animals but I think birds act smarter than the smartest computer characters(and birds aren't that smart).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: AI definitions
by Alfman on Sun 24th Jun 2012 16:54 in reply to "RE: AI definitions"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Fergy,

"Actors in a movie don't come across as dumb."

Interesting, but the actors in a movie are just following a script, and to that extent I would argue they ARE dumb in this respect since following a script does NOT require intelligence.

You can nitpick and say they need to be able to read the scripts and interact with other actors in order to do their jobs (which requires some intelligence). However actors don't technically have to understand a script, so that's setting a very low bar for "intelligence" in my opinion. One which computers could probably achieve in the short term if it weren't for the virtual/physical barrier I spoke about earlier.

Reply Parent Score: 2