Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 21st Jul 2012 23:06 UTC
In the News Okay, so this is entirely new to me. Sparrow is was an email client for Mac OS X and iOS (and Windows), which brought a decent Gmail experience to these platforms - as opposed to Apple's own not-so-good Gmail support and Google's Gmail iOS application which, well, is just a webpage. Google has now acquired Sparrow, and basically all hell has broken loose, to the point of Rian van der Merwe writing that 'we' lost "faith in a philosophy that we thought was a sustainable way to ensure a healthy future for independent software development, where most innovation happens".
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rufwork
Member since:
2012-07-23

The important thing to remember is that the OS is using BSD-licensed stuff under the hood. That means it was open source, but isn't any more.

The BSD is far too permissive, and doesn't protect software. I'm surprised it's considered an Open-as-in-Free license at all sometimes. "Please plagiarize my code and call it your own! I'm begging you!"

Reply Parent Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

And Safari and other parts of the system use khtml, euh webkit. Which is LGPL (library GPL).

It is why Google Chrome even exists.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kenji Member since:
2009-04-08

The important thing to remember is that the OS is using BSD-licensed stuff under the hood. That means it was open source, but isn't any more.

The BSD is far too permissive, and doesn't protect software. I'm surprised it's considered an Open-as-in-Free license at all sometimes. "Please plagiarize my code and call it your own! I'm begging you!"


Plagiarism implies theft.

Under the BSD license, the code is freely available and the license requires the original BSD licensee to be properly given credit. The BSD license is, in fact, a free/open license; it is just more closed source friendly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

That means it was open source, but isn't any more.


Err no. It means the original code is still open source but there might be changes done and used by Apple that isn't open source.

The BSD is far too permissive, and doesn't protect software


Says you but fortunately that's only your opinion and you don't get to decide on this for anyone else. It's none of your business how anyone else license their code.

I'm surprised it's considered an Open-as-in-Free license at all sometimes.


I'm not surprised but maybe that's because I don't feel a need to force my choice of license on everyone else.

"Please plagiarize my code and call it your own! I'm begging you!"


It's not plagiarism. Do you even know what that is?

Edited 2012-07-25 20:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2