Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 29th Oct 2005 20:44 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source The Free Software Foundation is just weeks away from announcing the roadmap and process that will govern the release of the first draft of the rewritten GNU General Public License.
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RE[2]: Thats nice and all...
by Temcat on Sun 30th Oct 2005 09:08 UTC in reply to "RE: Thats nice and all..."
Temcat
Member since:
2005-10-18

That's nice and all while GPL remains a copyright license. The moment is ceases to be such (as in: requiring to give away source code where binary distribution has NOT taken place), it becomes a EULA. It is my highly subective opinion that EULAs are contrary to the ideas of free software by their nature, however nice is motivation for their introduction.

Besides that, web services are NOT fundamentally different from any other services, be they performed by a human or a computer. Let's say a company performs work for its customers using a GPL-licensed office suite that it has modified but is not distributing to the outside world. Do you think it would be fair to require that this company release the modifications it has done to the office suite? I don't, therefore I oppose the planned new provisions of the license.

Reply Parent Score: 1

John Nilsson Member since:
2005-07-06

That's nice and all while GPL remains a copyright license. The moment is ceases to be such (as in: requiring to give away source code where binary distribution has NOT taken place), it becomes a EULA. It is my highly subective opinion that EULAs are contrary to the ideas of free software by their nature, however nice is motivation for their introduction.

See my previous post (anon because I forgot to login) about how that is a non-issue.

To clarify even more. It would not, by yor definition, be an EULA because the the clause would only limit the space of allowed derivative works, not how a derivative work could be used.


Besides that, web services are NOT fundamentally different from any other services, be they performed by a human or a computer. Let's say a company performs work for its customers using a GPL-licensed office suite that it has modified but is not distributing to the outside world. Do you think it would be fair to require that this company release the modifications it has done to the office suite? I don't, therefore I oppose the planned new provisions of the license.

With the rationales behind GPL beeing whay they are: Yes that would be fair to require. Why it isn't I actually don't know.

Reply Parent Score: 1