Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2012 22:52 UTC
Linux Miguel de Icaza: "To sum up: (a) First dimension: things change too quickly, breaking both open source and proprietary software alike; (b) incompatibility across Linux distributions. This killed the ecosystem for third party developers trying to target Linux on the desktop. You would try once, do your best effort to support the 'top' distro or if you were feeling generous 'the top three' distros. Only to find out that your software no longer worked six months later. Supporting Linux on the desktop became a burden for independent developers." Mac OS X came along to scoop up the Linux defectors.
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UltraZelda64
Member since:
2006-12-05

I must be different then, because I never had the need for a bitmap editor as extreme as Photoshop, and I never had a need for *any* CAD software outside of school. Hell, no one I know probably even knows what AutoCAD even is, and those that have Photoshop probably pirated it.

Me? Well, I bought a copy of Jasc Paint Shop Pro years ago, and after that I started to really like Paint.net during my last few years with Windows. I have toyed around with "trial" versions of Photoshop to see what all the fuss was about, but it has to be the most overkill, confusing, slow and bloated bitmap editor I have ever used. I was not impressed, and you would truly *need* to have some damn special requirements to actually want to pay 700-1000 bucks for a god damn bitmap editor. I honestly don't get it why so many people pirate it and then brag about it... I guess just to say that they got an ~$800 piece of software free?

Having been on Linux exclusively for over half a decade now, I do still miss Paint.net (it really was a pleasure to use), but I can get over it. I've been doing just fine on the GIMP, and I have got used to its multi-window approach years ago (which is actually very nice on a widescreen monitor). I'm actually anticipating trying out the new single-window mode, that should be interesting. But I can say that Windows has something good going for it with Paint.net.

Edited 2012-08-30 01:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Photoshop and AutoCAD are the de facto standard in some areas, and some people make a living using them. I know using the computer for professional purposes, what a weird concept...

Reply Parent Score: 1

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Photoshop and AutoCAD are the de facto standard in some areas, and some people make a living using them. I know using the computer for professional purposes, what a weird concept...

No, my point is exactly what you said. These programs are for highly specialized, professional purposes. The claim that a lot of people "choose" to run Windows for certain programs especially, and then listing these two specifically, is just false for the vast majority of Windows. That is the claim I was arguing.

They choose a computer; chances are it comes with Windows. Most of the time, Photoshop and AutoCAD don't even come into play. Many people probably don't really even know what the two programs are, and if they did, they would be lost if they tried to use them. Most of the people I know or have heard of that brags about having a program like one of these does it purely to brag that they got a ridiculously expensive program for free; a piece of software that they would have "legally" had to spent a metric shit-ton on just to get, that is way above their heads.

Edited 2012-08-30 02:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

trev Member since:
2006-11-22

virtualbox runs these, quickbooks and several others much better than the Windows 7 does from my experience. In particular I moved a client to Linux with XP in a VM to save them from buying another $4-5k/seat Autocad version that is needed to run it on Win 7. Win 7 could not run autocad even in XP mode. Now explaining virtualization and how they really are like 2 PCs in one and having it sink in is a bit of a task but after the first couple of weeks they got used to it and now they love it. The extra bonus of no viruses has made them an extremely happy client.

Reply Parent Score: 2

c0m47053 Member since:
2011-05-12

There is a project on Google Code to port Paint.NET to Mono, but it hasn't had much activity in the last few years.

http://code.google.com/p/paint-mono/

Oddly, the last commit is by Miguel De Icaza. It was a fix for Mac OS.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It been there for a while, not much interest.

Reply Parent Score: 2

ciplogic Member since:
2006-12-22

There is no need for updating paint-mono. It is already ported and kicking! Is named Pinta.

http://pinta-project.com/

Reply Parent Score: 4

tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22

Having been on Linux exclusively for over half a decade now, I do still miss Paint.net (it really was a pleasure to use), but I can get over it....But I can say that Windows has something good going for it with Paint.net.


If you like Paint.net you should check out Pinta:
http://pinta-project.com/

Reply Parent Score: 3

r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

You might want to take a look at Pinta, which is a project inspired by Paint.NET. http://pinta-project.com

Edit: Never mind, I need to refresh my pages more often.

Edited 2012-08-30 11:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2