Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 1st Sep 2012 21:15 UTC
Windows The Verge published a video demonstrating how desktop mode and Office 2013 - a desktop application - work on Windows RT, the ARM version of Windows 8. The video showed a desktop mode that clearly didn't work well for touch, and even Office 2013, which has a rudimentary touch mode built-in, didn't work properly either. It looked and felt clunky, often didn't respond properly, and even showed touch lag.
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RE[8]: Window opportuniry
by muchmeck on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 16:54 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Window opportuniry"
muchmeck
Member since:
2012-09-03


Linux has no place in the world or pro audio & video. While a very short list of software may be available, you'll be hard-pressed to find anyone who actually uses it. Real pro audio & video is completely dominated by Windows and OSX systems.





Wow! Have you worked in the entertainment industry? As a vfx artist my self who have, firstly, my own company and is currently employed by one of the major studios to do vfx for massive blockbuster movies (last two ones was main blockbuster releases this year). Yes there is alot of mac's here at work (only the management and that is not the main bulk of people) but that is also where they are. Our main OS IS Linux for three major reasons:

1) We have total control over the OS, there is no black magic happening behind the scene. We can modify it to the extent we want. So it fits the need of the studio.

2) It's free. Yes we have this as a major point to us. If we need to extend our workstation base (bring in emergency freelance artist) we don't need to buy 150-200 more licenses above the cost for the workstations, or our render-farm with about 500-1000 nodes (they are throwing around crazy numbers around here at work, at least for me and my own small company where we talk about say 5 - 20 new machines).

3) We have A LOT of in-house tools that is developed only for our pipeline to make the work we do faster. We base our pipeline on a of-the-shelf application and then extending that so our needs a met. Sure we're not using blender to any extent (or at all, it's installed and the artist are allowed to use it to create models. But no one does...). That is due to that unfortunately it's not up to par with the packages we us here and currently for us to switch would be a massive setback since we have a lot of time and money invested in this pipe, then if I would start a new company I would not choose either win or osx mainly for the points above this one.

And no. We aren't using photoshop. We're using a 3d painting app that allow us more flexibility and interconnection between our main app and this paint app. Our editorial office here at work uses a in-house cutting/editing app that our colorist and rnd-team has created, in Linux.

But then this whole argument can be circumvented depending on what you consider being "pro video". Creating a still image for a product visualization? Yes a lot of people are using win/osx and that is usually only (big generalization here) because they don't need the pipeline for manage all the data that an animation/vfx production need.

But hey that is just the way we deal with our stuff here at work (and at the places I've been to before).

just my two cents.


Ps.
Just looking at the "video" comment since I don't work in audio. I have absolutely no say in that or any knowledge about it's pipe and the normal setup at a recording studio
Ds.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Window opportuniry
by ilovebeer on Mon 3rd Sep 2012 18:22 in reply to "RE[8]: Window opportuniry"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

But then this whole argument can be circumvented depending on what you consider being "pro video".

To answer your first question, yes I work in entertainment/film/music.

Anyways, this whole thing started because of a blanket claim about linux being extremely popular in film & audio (no, that isn't a direct quote). Of course there are explicit environments (as you described) where it may be preferable, but to make the claim as a blanket for the entire industry is simply absurd.

Just looking at the "video" comment since I don't work in audio. I have absolutely no say in that or any knowledge about it's pipe and the normal setup at a recording studio

You may as well have antennas coming out of your head if you want to go into a recording studio talking about linux. I suppose saying that will attract petition from the lurking bedroom studio "pros".

Also, my comments are in response to the original & outlandish blanket claim. We can bring up specific use cases and debate it all day but there will never be a winner. The fields are vast and so are the opinions and setups. That being the case it's best to focus on the original claim and apply KISS.

Edited 2012-09-03 18:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2