Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 10th Sep 2012 11:26 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The rise of the tablet has heralded changes big and small across the tech ecosystem, from a booming market for cloud storage to the fall of Flash. If the computing industry was a stagnant pond in late 2009, the introduction of tablets a few months later was less akin to a pebble flicked from the shore and more like a boulder hurled from 10 feet up. The ripples have been widespread and lasting." Simple question: if an ordinary user used her laptop to check Facebook, the news, and read a few blogs, and now uses a tablet to do the exact same thing - how much has really changed? Are any of the things mentioned in this article - the rise of HTML5, streaming video, and internet storage - really the result of tablets?
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RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510
by gan17 on Mon 10th Sep 2012 23:32 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by MOS6510"
gan17
Member since:
2008-06-03

Yeah, I've seen newscasters use em, F1 and MotoGP people too. A few aftermarket motorcycle ECU makers offer Android APKs at their sites for different map settings. iPads make pretty useful MIDI or EFX controllers in music production environments as well. Not sure if they're ready for serious image/photo editing work yet, due to the large RAW file sizes from current SLR cameras, but they probably will in a few of years (Adobe and Corel probably have their own versions of tablets on the drawing board).

But for most people, work or play, they're still pretty much luxury items right now. Laptops are probably considered more "essential" for a business on a limited budget, simply because they can do a lot more "traditional" tasks faster.

I'd argue that smartphones (even before the iPhone) have contributed much more to this "change" we're speaking of. This is especially true for lower income people in developing countries. They'd have never thought of buying a desktop/laptop + home internet connection, but by replacing their old dumbphone (most of these people never had landlines before) with a cheap smartphone and decent prepaid plan, they're at least "connected" like the rest of us now without having to break the bank too much or resort to a cybercafe. For me, making basic rights (I consider internet access a basic right) more accessible to everyone is much more "life enriching" compared to giving a rich baby-boomer who felt lost in the "keyboard + mouse" age a 7 or 10" touchscreen so that he can feel empowered again.

Edited 2012-09-10 23:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by gan17 on Tue 11th Sep 2012 00:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Just to add,
I realize my point above doesn't directly relate to the topic. It's more about "changing the way you use tech" rather than "changing the tech we use", but I just wanted to throw that in there anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510
by dragos.pop on Tue 11th Sep 2012 11:50 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by MOS6510"
dragos.pop Member since:
2010-01-08

I'd argue that smartphones (even before the iPhone) have contributed much more to this "change" we're speaking of. This is especially true for lower income people in developing countries. They'd have never thought of buying a desktop/laptop + home internet connection, but by replacing their old dumbphone (most of these people never had landlines before) with a cheap smartphone and decent prepaid plan, they're at least "connected" like the rest of us now without having to break the bank too much or resort to a cybercafe.


While I do agree that smartphones have contributed to this "change", people in developing countries that could not afford a PC+Internet did not change their dumbphones with smartphones.

Mobile internet is more expensive than home internet and a PC is not so expensive. But I don't know the situation in Africa or rural parts of India for example.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by MOS6510
by Neolander on Tue 11th Sep 2012 12:12 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by MOS6510"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I think the OP's point was that in some countries that never had a reliable landline phone infrastructure to begin with, mobile internet connexions can be cheaper, faster, and have more coverage than the wired ones.

Not sure how this makes people ditch PCs for smartphones for everyday internet access though. Even in developing countries, a desktop or laptop with an EDGE/3G connexion sounds like a cheaper and more powerful choice for work.

Reply Parent Score: 2