Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 14th Sep 2012 22:30 UTC
Intel You'd think this sort of stuff belonged to the past - but no. Apparently, Microsoft is afraid of Android on its Windows 8 tablets, because Intel has just announced that it will provide no support for Linux on its clover Trail processors. Supposedly, this chip is "designed for Windows 8". What?
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Comment by redshift
by redshift on Fri 14th Sep 2012 23:08 UTC
redshift
Member since:
2006-05-06

I am not sure this actually prevents OEMs from building Clover Trail systems. It just means the OEM would have to take the burden of certifying compatibility. That compatibility would come slower if Intel is not cooperative with the linux community.

If it is the result of a MS deal.... slowing down linux/android may be all MS hoped to accomplish.

Now I suppose that Intel could add DRM that actively prevents linux from working on those chips.

It seems like a poor plan for a chipmaker to actively limit their potential market.... even if MS dropped cash on your doorstep.

Edited 2012-09-14 23:09 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by redshift
by phoudoin on Fri 14th Sep 2012 23:12 in reply to "Comment by redshift"
phoudoin Member since:
2006-06-09

A poor plan and, if it's an hidden exclusive deal, maybe also an illegal one.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Comment by redshift
by bassbeast on Sat 15th Sep 2012 02:28 in reply to "Comment by redshift"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Its more likely it doesn't have a thing to do with MS and has everything to do with IP. Its pretty well known that Intel has been using PowerVR IGPs in many of its mobile processors and PowerVR really couldn't care less about Linux support.

So what is Intel supposed to do? The IGPs they have in the core series will blow the power budget, their other in house IGP suck, so that pretty much leaves the PowerVR team.

If Linux would have gotten more than 1% of the market this wouldn't have happened, but getting the devs on the same page is like herding cats so give it up, Intel had to make a call and take the best they could get that would support the most consumers. After all its not like they could call up Nvidia after they shafted them out of the IGP business could they?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by redshift
by johnboyholmes on Sat 15th Sep 2012 03:38 in reply to "RE: Comment by redshift"
johnboyholmes Member since:
2005-11-16

Really, Android and Linux Servers only have a 1% market share. TIL

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Comment by redshift
by saso on Sat 15th Sep 2012 10:19 in reply to "RE: Comment by redshift"
saso Member since:
2007-04-18

Its more likely it doesn't have a thing to do with MS and has everything to do with IP. Its pretty well known that Intel has been using PowerVR IGPs in many of its mobile processors and PowerVR really couldn't care less about Linux support.


Let's be clear, this is pure unsupported conjecture. (N.B. not agreeing with you doesn't mean I agree with Thom.)

So what is Intel supposed to do? The IGPs they have in the core series will blow the power budget, their other in house IGP suck, so that pretty much leaves the PowerVR team.


How about at least putting out a binary blob driver, like lots of vendors do? (nVidia, AMD, Broadcom, etc.) This argument has been shown to be wrong before.

If Linux would have gotten more than 1% of the market this wouldn't have happened,


You do realize that the non-Apple tablet market (for which this chip is almost certainly targeted) is about 100% Android (and thus Linux)? Windows 8 has 0% of the market. Thus, from a pure business perspective (even accepting your above arguments about IGPs), it makes next to no sense at all to target a non-existent market with a new product, unless there are other motives behind it as well (such as an exclusivity deal with Microsoft). Just to drive this point home a bit better, let's quote the linked article on the The Inquirer:

As Intel is pushing Clover Trail into tablets, a category of devices that is dominated by Linux based Android and the Unix BSD based IOS, the firm said it will not support Linux on Clover Trail.


Is this absolute 100% proof that Intel and Microsoft have an exclusivity deal? No. But it makes it extremely likely, to the point of being beyond a reasonable doubt.

Edited 2012-09-15 10:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Comment by redshift
by blitze on Sat 15th Sep 2012 23:07 in reply to "RE: Comment by redshift"
blitze Member since:
2006-09-15

Love your analogy of herding cats to try bringing linux developers on the same page. Thing is, with cats, you don't herd, you call them to you. I'm sure this approach could also work with developers.
Just a tip from one who breeds Burmese Cats ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by redshift
by Liquidator on Sat 15th Sep 2012 20:54 in reply to "Comment by redshift"
Liquidator Member since:
2007-03-04

Yes, it's an MS deal. It's all about money. Some of the responsible are also Microsoft customers who take part in this ripoff when they pay their MS tax.

Reply Parent Score: 2