Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th Sep 2012 16:08 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "High Tech Computer (HTC) has grown up with Microsoft, from the old HTC-built iPAQ's running on Microsoft's Pocket PC operating system, to the Orange SPV - Microsoft's first Windows smartphone. The Taiwanese company has always been a loyal aid to the software giant, but lately that close relationship has started to feel a little dated. HTC's investment in Android and its Sense user interface has taken precedent over its initial work with Windows Mobile, and the company's Windows Phone flagships have been impressive, but overshadowed by Nokia's colorful Lumia range and partnership with Microsoft. That all appears to be changing though." HTC announced some good-looking Windows Phone 8 phones (ugh) today, but from my personal experience of owning several devices from both brands for over a decade, Nokia has the edge on quality. Good to see a serious commitment to WP8 though - we wouldn't want the Android dominance to continue.
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niemau
Member since:
2007-06-28

We wouldn't want the Android dominance to continue?

Given the choice between dominant Android and dominant WP, I pick Android.

Why wish success for a platform so hostile to openness and interoperability? I don't want to install some crappy, proprietary syncing software on some blessed proprietary operating system just to use my device as intended.

Furthermore, I want to be able to install what I want, procured from wherever I want. I want to be able to develop and distribute my software however I want, without being completely beholden to a gatekeeper's potentially arbitrary whims.

To be honest, why can't we wish dominance to open standards and *actual* ownership of our own devices?

Reply Score: 6

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

What do you mean? My pictures, videos, documents, calendars, contacts, and notes are accessible from any device with a web browser thanks to the cloud.

My apps are synced across devices, and I can browse and install apps from any OS using just my browser. I don't understand where there is a lack of reach?

And yeah, I'm sure your developed behind closed doors, with closed binary drivers, and non standard Java bytecode is the pinnacle of open.

Please.

Reply Parent Score: 3

niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

You suggest a browser as a good alternative to something I should be able to see from my file manager of choice? God knows I want to be tethered to the net just to get at something usually sitting in my pocket. Right...

Cloud services are not an acceptable solution for me, or for many others. If you can't see why a cloud-only solution is a hindrance, I guess that's where our conversation has to end, at least on that topic. Different strokes for different folks, and all that.

And for the record, I'm not granting Google some magical title of "completely open". I'm just picking the lesser of two evils because they still allow some semblance of user control over their own freaking devices.

Personally, I don't find ANY current smartphone OS acceptable in regards to openness.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Nelson,

"What do you mean? My pictures, videos, documents, calendars, contacts, and notes are accessible from any device with a web browser thanks to the cloud. My apps are synced across devices, and I can browse and install apps from any OS using just my browser. I don't understand where there is a lack of reach?"


I did a double take when you said this. Not to cause a ruckus, but out of genuine interest why the sudden change of heart over the legitimacy of having web apps instead of native ones? Is my sarcasm detector broken?

http://www.osnews.com/thread?534990

Nelson: "[Javascript is] barely palatable on the web, do not push it into the app space where there are much higher expectations. People have come to expect the web to be a sub optimal experience."

http://www.osnews.com/thread?535005

Nelson: "...the argument is that JS+HTML is god awful choice for app development."

Nelson: "On the web, I'm cool with JS and HTML. Let the web be the web. But for Christ's sake, let apps be apps."


http://www.osnews.com/thread?535333

Nelson: "Also, my apps feel more native, perform better, and I achive comparable productivity with just slapping together an alien feeling HTML5 website and calling it a day by stuffing it into an app."

Reply Parent Score: 6

judgen Member since:
2006-07-12

Define the cloud.
Noone has said what it means, but microsoft and apple is pursuing the cloud 2.0 now. Oracle had it right in my mind. Web2.0, cloud and more is just services and providers. Pointless naming shit.

Reply Parent Score: 1

ze_jerkface Member since:
2012-06-22

We wouldn't want the Android dominance to continue?

...

To be honest, why can't we wish dominance to open standards and *actual* ownership of our own devices?


Android is more open but the experience is so meh.

It's nice that you can side-load with Android but there is nothing to install that I care about. I use my smartphone as a phone and browser 99% of the time and that is where WP7 really shines.

Reply Parent Score: 1

niemau Member since:
2007-06-28

The problem (well, *one* problem) is that smartphones are being positioned to kill the general purpose PC.

The big guys know this and are trying to vest as much control as they can this time around and get rid of pesky concepts like 'device ownership' and 'user control'. Think locked-down app stores and development models.

If we, as consumers, are willing to replace our computers with smartphones and tablets, we really need to start examining what we're giving up. When everybody's buying smartphones and tablets, the general purpose computer market will begin to dry up.

Personally, I'd like to make sure that the good parts of existing computer culture survive into the next evolution of computing.

So much of today's tech innovation was born in the humble home computer room. The barrier to market entry is already becoming more difficult for small players now that walled gardens becoming the de facto method of software distribution. Even on the desktop, Apple and MS are trying to push their app stores over traditional retail channels.

This is all really important stuff to think about, and it seems like most people just aren't interested in the long-term implications of today's trends. We're not just gaining convenience by subscribing to this new computing model. We're also giving up independent software development and retail. We're also signing up for more regular forced hardware upgrades. It's no secret that smartphone and tablet manufacturers aren't exactly chomping at the bit to provide indefinite software updates.

If smartphones and tablets are to supplant the good ol' general purpose computer, we need to stop thinking of them as simple consumer electronics and demand at least some of the accessibility and control we've relied on for the past 30-ish years.

Sorry for the mouthful.

Reply Parent Score: 2