Linked by Howard Fosdick on Tue 25th Sep 2012 22:17 UTC
Bugs & Viruses You might assume your new PC is secure, but is it? In the U.S., the Federal Trade Commission just charged seven rent-to-own computer companies and a software design firm with computer spying. Some 420,000 rent-to-own computers allegedly secretly collected personal information, took pictures of users in their homes, and tracked their locations. Meanwhile Microsoft found that PCs from China had malware embedded before reaching consumers. The virus "could allow a hacker to switch on a microphone or Webcam, record keystrokes and access users' login credentials and online bank accounts." And, an FBI investigation found that counterfeit routers purchased by various US government agencies also were pre-loaded with malicious software. Do you assume your new PC is secure, or if not, what steps do you take to secure it?
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Good argument for multibooting
by benali72 on Tue 25th Sep 2012 23:29 UTC
benali72
Member since:
2008-05-03

I would never trust any Windows install. This used to be no problem, because all you had to do was reinstall from the OS media. Now, of course, they don't give you any media, so that you're stuck with all their preloaded crapware, malware, whatever. My solution these days has been to rely on Linux for daily use and only use Windows for certain apps.

Reply Score: 5

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Very true. I agree. I never did fully trust OEM versions of Windows, and these days it's worse than ever. At least in the past they were stored on a form of ROM, but now, it's all on a rewritable, infectable drive. If it couldn't be trusted in the past, then it really can't be trusted now. Hard drive crash? $30+ to get a replacement CD/DVD-ROM disc set that should have been shipped with the machine in the first place.

I personally wouldn't settle for anything less than official Microsoft retail media of the OS, and because that tends to cost so much and with so many licensing limitations (also enforced with software), Linux and BSD are the best choices.

Edited 2012-09-26 00:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

All you gotta do is google it and you can find the media pretty easily and if it is coming from an obviously safe download source you are going to be fine.

There is a difference between being careful and paranoia.

Reply Parent Score: 4

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

I would never trust any Windows install. This used to be no problem, because all you had to do was reinstall from the OS media. Now, of course, they don't give you any media, so that you're stuck with all their preloaded crapware, malware, whatever.


As bad as it is on Windows, it's even worse on Android. With Windows, at least you can find a clean ISO if you're smart enough to know where to look. With Android, you're happy if somebody manages to unlock the bootloader and port stock Android to your device. Even then, you're installing a build that was made by some hacker whom you don't even know.

For this reason (and many others), I only roll with pure Google devices ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2