Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 26th Sep 2012 20:16 UTC, submitted by Bob Stein
Windows ActiveWin.com has just posted their 45-page, 40-screenshot review of Microsoft Windows 8. The review covers many different aspects of the OS including performance, security, application compatibility, and more. "Is Windows 8 a hit or miss? It's a hit, it is clearly Microsoft's most bold development in years, it probably beats out the transition from Program Manager (Windows 3X) to Windows 95, the move from Windows 9x to the NT Kernel. The Windows 8 platform represents so many things: truly touch centric, support for modern processor architectures, fast and fluid as Microsoft puts it and also represents where the majority of the world is heading when it comes to computing, entirely mobile."
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RE: Hmmm
by kaiwai on Thu 27th Sep 2012 06:43 UTC in reply to "Hmmm"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Sounds like Windows is not so much better at in-place upgrades than Linux, after all. Good thing that old releases are supported for a longer time by Microsoft.


Or he is running untested drivers on an unreleased operating system on two computers from two notoriously crappy computer manufacturers - sure, what could possibly go wrong with such a stella combination! Wait a month AFTER it is actually released and heck, the person wrote the article September 5, almost two months before it actually being released! I mean, come on - if you want to critique and criticise Windows then by all means do so but how about waiting till it is actually released.

Side note, software vendors are already releasing updates for Windows 8 compatibility issues; Adobe over the last couple of weeks have released updates for their Creative Suite 6 that address possible Windows 8 compatibility woes. The issues are being addressed so lets put on a Cat Stevens record, pour a cup of tea and chill out for a moment.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmmm
by Neolander on Thu 27th Sep 2012 07:56 in reply to "RE: Hmmm"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

"Sounds like Windows is not so much better at in-place upgrades than Linux, after all. Good thing that old releases are supported for a longer time by Microsoft."

Or he is running untested drivers on an unreleased operating system on two computers from two notoriously crappy computer manufacturers - sure, what could possibly go wrong with such a stella combination!

Do you think that people who complain about Xorg or NetworkManager breaking after an update because of some explicitly unsupported proprietary driver for equally crappy hardware would care about such technicalities ? ;)

If hardware breaks for some people, it's a problem. Sadly, many people happen to buy crappy hardware because it's cheap and they don't know enough about tech to be aware of what that they are doing. So...

Wait a month AFTER it is actually released and heck, the person wrote the article September 5, almost two months before it actually being released! I mean, come on - if you want to critique and criticise Windows then by all means do so but how about waiting till it is actually released.

Windows 8 has been declared RTM and distributed to OEMs more than one month ago. So what this guy tested is a final release, that will be installed on every store's PCs worldwide pretty soon.

If at this stage, there are still issues with widely used features and hardware such as ACPI suspend or Synaptics touchpads, that is quite a big issue that should not be handwaved with a "meh, they will fix it in SP1 a few months after launch anyway".

Side note, software vendors are already releasing updates for Windows 8 compatibility issues; Adobe over the last couple of weeks have released updates for their Creative Suite 6 that address possible Windows 8 compatibility woes. The issues are being addressed so lets put on a Cat Stevens record, pour a cup of tea and chill out for a moment.

Sure, sure. Still, there are some things that cannot be fixed with updates, such as an input peripheral breakage that prevents people from installing these updates altogether.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Hmmm
by kaiwai on Thu 27th Sep 2012 08:37 in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Do you think that people who complain about Xorg or NetworkManager breaking after an update because of some explicitly unsupported proprietary driver for equally crappy hardware would care about such technicalities ? ;)


The problem is the fault of Linux failing to provide a stable driver API/ABI - if Linux provided said stable interface then the responsibility could be then placed back on the shoulders of hardware vendors to maintain their drivers. The reality is that every distribution of Linux isn't compatible with the next, you can't simply just grab a driver compiled against one kernel version of a particular distribution and then have it work without any problems on another - that is the fault of the OS vendor. Compare that to Windows which has a stable API and ABI thus barring any stupid decisions made by the programmers at said third party hardware vendor then things should work without too many problems.

If hardware breaks for some people, it's a problem. Sadly, many people happen to buy crappy hardware because it's cheap and they don't know enough about tech to be aware of what that they are doing. So...


You don't have to be technically inclined to realise "you get what you paid for" - heck, my sister bought an el-cheapo NZ$600 Acer laptop and she knew what she was getting but as she said to me it was a throw away laptop and that should be move onto something better later on. Lets not assume that every person out there is clueless because a fair chunk of people, even if it is by gut instinct alone, that you pay for what you get and that the extra money isn't necessarily for the brand but also the fact that these companies support you for the long haul.

Windows 8 has been declared RTM and distributed to OEMs more than one month ago. So what this guy tested is a final release, that will be installed on every store's PCs worldwide pretty soon.

If at this stage, there are still issues with widely used features and hardware such as ACPI suspend or Synaptics touchpads, that is quite a big issue that should not be handwaved with a "meh, they will fix it in SP1 a few months after launch anyway".


Which mean nothing given that OEM will have newer drivers from their suppliers than what is actually available on the internet. Synaptic for example is already shipping Windows 8 compliant drivers through Lenovo (IIRC 16.2.x) which aren't available on the Synaptic website itself. Regarding ACPI, again, that requires a power management driver which requires the OEM to provide an updated driver - again, if it is anything like the Lenovo situation then the driver will be release either on the day or a week or two after Windows 8 has actually hit the market. Windows 8 has been RTM'ed but it is not general availability, it isn't shipping and very few hardware vendors have Windows 8 test drivers available - again, come back once Windows 8 has actually shipped to the general public then draw your own conclusions base on reality and not someones half baked review based on September 5 drivers that were tested only on Windows 7.

Sure, sure. Still, there are some things that cannot be fixed with updates, such as an input peripheral breakage that prevents people from installing these updates altogether.


Then you should wait till the driver has been released - goodness gracious me, what is so f--king hard about looking up the hardware vendors website and checking whether they have a Windows 8 compatible driver first before deciding to install? install first ask questions later?

Edited 2012-09-27 08:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Hmmm
by zima on Mon 1st Oct 2012 21:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Hmmm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Sadly, many people happen to buy crappy hardware because it's cheap and they don't know enough about tech to be aware of what that they are doing. So...

Though expensive, high-sticker-price hardware doesn't really assure future support. It being rarer, more niche, can in fact decrease the chances...

Around here I have two webcams from the end of last century. One is as-classic-as-it-gets Logitech Quickam Express, very inexpensive even at the time ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QuickCam#Cameras and mine is even a black-logo OEM package, was notably less expensive) ...and with quite horrible quality, fairly crappy overall. The other is a Philips Vesta Pro/Scan, with decent quality, exceptional low-light performance (which gave it a prominent place in amateur astrophotography http://homepage.ntlworld.com/molyned/web-cameras.htm http://www.pmdo.com/wintro.htm http://keithwiley.com/vesta675mod/vesta675mod2.shtml http://thierrylambert.free.fr/materiel/vestapro/vestaprocielprofond... http://www.astrosurf.com/astrobond/ebmate.htm ), and quite pricey in its day, I believe (it found its way to me as a surplus hw) ...remaining so for a while, I think, with how it was sought-after for astro.

Now, I'll let you guess which one of those webcams is supported by all popular Windows versions in a totally plug'n'play fashion (as in, you connect it and everything works, the driver is included with the OS - despite the webcam predating USB video class standard), and which is supported only up to XP... (and requiring 3rd party driver there)

Similar with one "pro" audio card that also found its way to me, E-mu APS, essentially abandoned a long time ago. Except, it's related to SB Live! (I believe APS was the first card using the EMU10K1 chip - it sure has visibly "old style" packaging there), so it's supported by a sort of community project targeting this family: http://kxproject.lugosoft.com/


If you want to be safest from driver woes, get what's popular and still suitable to your needs.

Still, there are some things that cannot be fixed with updates, such as an input peripheral breakage that prevents people from installing these updates altogether.

Oh I don't know if this one would be so bad - from what I see, most laptops are used with a mouse attached, anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 2