Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 30th Sep 2012 19:13 UTC, submitted by Beket_
Slackware, Slax "Slackware 14.0 brings many updates and enhancements, among which you'll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available today: Xfce 4.10.0, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 4.8.5, a recent stable release of the 4.8.x series of the award-winning KDE desktop environment. [...] Slackware uses the 3.2.29 kernel bringing you advanced performance features such as journaling filesystems, SCSI and ATA RAID volume support, SATA support, Software RAID, LVM (the Logical Volume Manager), and encrypted filesystems. Kernel support for X DRI (the Direct Rendering Interface) brings high-speed hardware accelerated 3D graphics to Linux."
Thread beginning with comment 537081
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Sun 30th Sep 2012 20:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Sodki"
Sodki
Member since:
2005-11-10

So after being a former user... what made you install it today?


I like tinkering. It's the same reason I like to test new versions of KDE, even though I completely dislike KDE; or installing every new version of Fedora, even though I completely dislike it's package management.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Sodki
by JoshuaS on Sun 30th Sep 2012 20:14 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Sodki"
JoshuaS Member since:
2011-09-15

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by Sodki
by VenomousGecko on Sun 30th Sep 2012 20:19 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Sodki"
VenomousGecko Member since:
2005-07-06

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )


In my opinion, you had the right idea with the second part of your comment. I think that using Slackware to learn Linux IS a great benefit over other distros. Also, as a Slackware user on a server, I find I am able to strip it down to the bare essentials easier than other distributions. The ability to install only what you need without much worry about having to fulfill dependencies is refreshing.

It all depends on what you are looking for, however, to determine if the above should be viewed as benefits.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Sodki
by Sodki on Sun 30th Sep 2012 22:09 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Sodki"
Sodki Member since:
2005-11-10

You're right. Slackware does not offer any benefits over other distro's. But maintaining and trying new things out on a Slackware machine is so great as a hobby and you learn a lot from it ( it's about as close as you can get to a pure form of Linux, with no distro-specific things, without going the insanely time consuming LFS route )


You're right, you can learn a lot of things. I did, especially when trying stuff that clearly wasn't designed for Slackware. But I (cautiously) disagree with the "pure Linux" statement. As far as I recall, Slackware had it's own file system hierarchy, which made things funkier to deal at times. Feel free to slap me if I'm wrong. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Sodki
by bradley on Sun 30th Sep 2012 22:29 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Sodki"
bradley Member since:
2007-03-02

No argument there... BSD? :-P

Reply Parent Score: 1