Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Oct 2012 22:21 UTC
Windows Paul Allen, one of Microsoft's co-founders who left the company long ago, has posted on his blog about his experiences with Windows 8. He (surprise) likes it, but he does note a number of shortcomings and oddities - all of which are spot-on. However, he fails to address the core issue with Windows 8: it's forcing users to drill a small hole in the wall with a belt sander.
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RE: Musings about Metro
by tomcat on Thu 4th Oct 2012 17:39 UTC in reply to "Musings about Metro"
tomcat
Member since:
2006-01-06

I'm still advocating violence against the f--ktard who decided that horizontal scrolling was a good idea


Just out of curiosity, have you ever used the iPhone? Android? iPad? Windows Phone? Because ALL of them have horizontal scrolling UIs. Yeah, the Windows variants use slightly larger customizable "tiles" in lieu of grids of icons; but the concept is essentially identical. So, unless you're advocating violence against THE ENTIRE MOBILE INDUSTRY, I'm not sure what your point is.

Furthermore, do you understand what's happening in the industry today? What Microsoft is doing has nothing to do with power user versus n00b. Tablets are the fastest growing category of computers being sold today. Period. Desktop shipments are stagnating. Laptops are starting to lose ground to tablets. Microsoft has done a pretty damned good job of creating a competitive tablet OS. Now, there are legitimate questions about whether it should have created different SKUs for different hardware targets; meaning that the desktop doesn't get Metro, tablets do, servers don't, laptops do. But there is also a credible argument that the consistency of the user interface across targets is more valuable to users; if they hadn't done this, there would be a lot of power users complaining about how different the SKUs were. Which means: Complaining is universal. You're not going to make everyone happy all the time. But that doesn't mean Win8 won't be successful. It will be. The lure of a huge hardware ecosystem and a store to sell their stuff in will bring tons of developers back to their platform.

Edited 2012-10-04 17:51 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Musings about Metro
by tidux on Thu 4th Oct 2012 19:00 in reply to "RE: Musings about Metro"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Horizontal scrolling is fine on a mobile device. It's infuriating and useless on a desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Musings about Metro
by WorknMan on Thu 4th Oct 2012 19:07 in reply to "RE: Musings about Metro"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Just out of curiosity, have you ever used the iPhone? Android? iPad? Windows Phone? Because ALL of them have horizontal scrolling UIs.


I have never seen a phone or tablet app that uses horizontal scrolling in an app, especially while you're reading. (See the Metro Wikipedia app as an example.) Again, somebody deserves to be beaten to death.

Furthermore, do you understand what's happening in the industry today?


Yeah, I understand exactly what's happening. Tablets are selling by the millions, so OS vendors are dumbing down the desktop experience in order to appeal to all those mouth breathers who think that iOS is the most advanced mobile OS on the planet.

Microsoft has done a pretty damned good job of creating a competitive tablet OS. Now, there are legitimate questions about whether it should have created different SKUs for different hardware targets; meaning that the desktop doesn't get Metro, tablets do, servers don't, laptops do. But there is also a credible argument that the consistency of the user interface across targets is more valuable to users; if they hadn't done this, there would be a lot of power users complaining about how different the SKUs were. Which means: Complaining is universal. You're not going to make everyone happy all the time.


I think MS could've made everybody happy by giving people the ability to disable Metro completely in Windows 8 and bring the Start menu back. That way, people who like Metro can have it, and people (like me) who don't can get rid of it.

If you want to make the same OS for tablet and desktop, that's okay. But at LEAST make it not suck so much ass on the desktop before you make it non-removable.

Look, I am not anti-Windows 8. In fact, I plan to upgrade to it myself. But to power users, there is absolutely no way you can defend that piece of shit known as Metro. If tech tards love it, fine. It is what it is. But I ain't loving it. At least not this release.

Edited 2012-10-04 19:11 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Musings about Metro
by Alfman on Thu 4th Oct 2012 19:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Musings about Metro"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

WorknMan,

"I think MS could've made everybody happy by giving people the ability to disable Metro completely in Windows 8 and bring the Start menu back. That way, people who like Metro can have it, and people (like me) who don't can get rid of it."

Exactly what I wanted to say. I can respect the opinion of those who like metro, as long as they can respect my opinion that I don't like it for what I do. I don't want to be dependent upon it to launch my applications.

As I mentioned in another post, the previews DID permit the restoration of the start menu through a registry hack, but microsoft is so adamant that we don't have this choice in win8 that they removed the code entirely.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Musings about Metro
by Alfman on Thu 4th Oct 2012 19:34 in reply to "RE: Musings about Metro"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

tomcat,

"Now, there are legitimate questions about whether it should have created different SKUs for different hardware targets; meaning that the desktop doesn't get Metro, tablets do, servers don't, laptops do. But there is also a credible argument that the consistency of the user interface across targets is more valuable to users; if they hadn't done this, there would be a lot of power users complaining about how different the SKUs were."


Your overlooking the obvious. The problem isn't that anyone wants a metro version and a non-metro version. The problem is that we want metro to be optional and configurable. In one win8 preview, the win7 desktop launcher could be restored by a simple registry tweak. Microsoft spent more engineering effort to remove the feature than was needed to just leave it there. Therein lies the fundamental problem, microsoft would rather cannibalize the desktop launcher and corral users into metro rather than letting users choose metro on it's own merits.

Regardless of anyone's opinion over metro's merits, it's still illustrative of how corporate monopolies are harmful to consumer choice.

Reply Parent Score: 2