Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 21st Oct 2012 16:13 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
Windows "I've been writing about Windows for almost 20 years, and I feel like I've kind of seen it all. But for the past several days, I've been struggling under the weight of the most brutal email onslaught I've ever endured over these two decades. And if my email is any indication, and I believe it is, the majority of people out there have absolutely no idea what Windows RT is. This is a problem." When even Paul Thurrot is worried, you can be sure it is, actually, a problem. We're going to see and hear about a lot of frustrated customer who can't load up their 1997 copy of Awesome Garden Designer 2.0 Deluxe.
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RE: Comment by sagum
by Vanders on Sun 21st Oct 2012 22:48 UTC in reply to "Comment by sagum"
Vanders
Member since:
2005-07-06

I personally think Microsoft dropped the ball when they made Office a desktop App for RT. It should really have been Metro (apps for windows 8 ofc), metro only and the desktop itself should have been disabled for RT devices.


This is not your fault, bit I think this quote highlights the problems Microsoft face. A desktop app for RT? Why is that different from Metro? How is the same? What about the desktop? Microsoft have confused themselves, let alone us.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by sagum
by sagum on Mon 22nd Oct 2012 08:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by sagum"
sagum Member since:
2006-01-23

"I personally think Microsoft dropped the ball when they made Office a desktop App for RT. It should really have been Metro (apps for windows 8 ofc), metro only and the desktop itself should have been disabled for RT devices.


This is not your fault, bit I think this quote highlights the problems Microsoft face. A desktop app for RT? Why is that different from Metro? How is the same? What about the desktop? Microsoft have confused themselves, let alone us.
"


RT just means its an ARM powered device. Microsoft decided to lock down the desktop of ARM compiled apps for what ever reason, be it SDK/API or something else.
Where as Metro apps work across the platforms without users having to worry if they're x86 or ARM versions to be installed so I can see why they've limited the desktop apps in that sense.

The only thing I can think of is that the Metro UI for all the crital system components is not ready for a true replacement, meaning users would need to fall back to the desktop to fix it still. If this is (and it seems like it), I'd have prefered the desktop when in safe mode or running as Admin with Office as metro app.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by sagum
by bassbeast on Tue 23rd Oct 2012 14:44 in reply to "RE: Comment by sagum"
bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

Frankly this, this right here, is why MSFT has never had a chance at the mobile space. Remember how they were into smartphones years before Apple ever even thought of an iPhone? what did they do? they tried to tie it into the Windows branding, complete with teeny tiny desktop and start button and of course it bombed.

I'll never forget the article i read a few years ago with the founder of Neversoft and why he walked away from his baby WinAmp while it was still popular: "They just wouldn't listen, they kept trying to force everything to come back to "the product" (AOL dialup) when we could see the market for the product was dying and nobody wanted it,by the end they were forcing us to bundle the entire software suit with every copy of WinAmp!"

And that is MSFT in 2012 in a nutshell, instead of accepting the fact that like IBM with the mainframe while Windows will pretty much own the desktop forever the world simply isn't gonna revolve around desktops like it did in the 90s and thus letting their other divisions to get out from under the Windows legacy and truly innovate they instead keep trying to tie everything back to "the product" that made their fortune back in the day while refusing to see those glory days are past.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by sagum
by zima on Thu 25th Oct 2012 04:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by sagum"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Winamp is most likely still quite popular. One reasonably reliable source of stats http://store.steampowered.com/hwsurvey/ shows iTunes at ~30% and Winamp at ~20%, a comparable reach (curiously, it shows WMP at 33... not sure what that means, maybe Steam can determine if WMP is actually used)

What you see locally might be influenced by large, in my experience, geographical differences in software usage. Kinda like what is clearly visible with browsers http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Countries_by_most_used_web_b... or office suites http://www.webmasterpro.de/portal/news/2010/02/05/international-ope... or mobile phones (some clearly visible differences after checking few of http://www.opera.com/smw/ reports) or IM networks (ICQ for example is still going strong ...in CIS; plus it looks like we'll have WhatsApp in the western world, LINE in eastern; and at my place, a dominant position is held by IM network you haven't even heard about).

Same with iPods and iPhones - apart from relatively few ~western places, they generally barely exist in the rest of the world. That alone should greatly influence the adoption of iTunes and its alternatives.

For what personal anecdotes are worth - here, in central Europe, I rarely see people using iTunes. Winamp is definitely a more frequent sight. And on Last.fm ("now playing" of other people usually displays their player) those two plus Spotify seem to get roughly equal share, IIRC; even foobar2k shows up quite frequently.

I think you mean Nullsoft BTW. ;) And I suppose international downloads omitted AOL package...

And that is MSFT in 2012 in a nutshell, instead of accepting the fact that like IBM with the mainframe while Windows will pretty much own the desktop forever the world simply isn't gonna revolve around desktops like it did in the 90s and thus letting their other divisions to get out from under the Windows legacy and truly innovate they instead keep trying to tie everything back to "the product" that made their fortune back in the day while refusing to see those glory days are past.

Hm, Xbox and Skype (totally multi-platform) divisions show that to be not quite the case?

Edited 2012-10-25 04:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2