Linked by Howard Fosdick on Sat 24th Nov 2012 17:52 UTC
Editorial Do you depend on your computer for your living? If so, I'm sure you've thought long and hard about which hardware and software to use. I'd like to explain why I use generic "white boxes" running open source software. These give me a platform I rely on for 100% availability. They also provide a low-cost solution with excellent security and privacy.
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RE[2]: I couldn't agree more
by telns on Mon 26th Nov 2012 18:12 UTC in reply to "RE: I couldn't agree more"
telns
Member since:
2009-06-18

Windows Vista/7 and 8 can also deal with that. I have had the same Windows installation cross motherboard hardware ... the only common denominator was the processor was intel.


I've done this often.

One Windows 2K3 array I've moved hardware three times without a hitch. My current desktop switched pretty much everything, including processor mfg, when I cloned it over to the new one. It worked fine, from big stuff all the way down to the color calibration of my monitors.

I think it is a bit of a myth that Windows can't deal with this. From Windows 2000 on, it seems pretty solid. I never tried it on desktops back in 3.x - 9x days, so I can't comment. Maybe it didn't work back then. I did move NT4 around few times, and it worked OK, but I did not do that often.

Edited 2012-11-26 18:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I couldn't agree more
by helf on Mon 26th Nov 2012 18:51 in reply to "RE[2]: I couldn't agree more"
helf Member since:
2005-07-06

It actually works with 9x as well. Windows *can* be REALLY finicky, but, in general, it works fine if you do it correctly.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

They even had "Hardware profiles in previous versions of Windows."

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: I couldn't agree more
by telns on Tue 27th Nov 2012 03:35 in reply to "RE[3]: I couldn't agree more"
telns Member since:
2009-06-18

Good point! I'd forgotten about those. I think they were mostly used for docking stations, but I bet not exclusively.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I couldn't agree more
by darkcoder on Tue 27th Nov 2012 15:36 in reply to "RE[2]: I couldn't agree more"
darkcoder Member since:
2006-07-14

I think it is a bit of a myth that Windows can't deal with this.


They can deal fine as long as you stay in the same architecture. Example upgrade from an old Intel Core DUO to an i7, or from an AMD Athlon II/Phenom to a FX.

But if you do cross-architecture upgrade, then good luck with that.

Linux does not only survive that, it will boot without problems due to kernel having most drivers build in. The only one that will probably need re installation is the proprietary video driver and only if the card chip family changes (ie AMD->NVIDIA)

Edited 2012-11-27 15:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: I couldn't agree more
by bentoo on Tue 27th Nov 2012 16:47 in reply to "RE[3]: I couldn't agree more"
bentoo Member since:
2012-09-21

They can deal fine as long as you stay in the same architecture. Example upgrade from an old Intel Core DUO to an i7, or from an AMD Athlon II/Phenom to a FX. But if you do cross-architecture upgrade, then good luck with that.


Not a problem since Vista/2008. I do plenty of swaps between AMD and Intel architectures. The only trouble I've had was storage drivers. (You need to make sure drivers for the boot device/controller are installed before swapping -- Linux would have the same problem).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: I couldn't agree more
by telns on Tue 27th Nov 2012 20:29 in reply to "RE[3]: I couldn't agree more"
telns Member since:
2009-06-18

I went from a Core 2 to an FX* without any issue. Stunningly, all my paused Windows (and Linux) VMs resumed without error, even though the processor type changed underneath them "hot" (CPU type is one of the things passed through to the guest).

Storage usually is the most delicate, at least if anything goes wrong, but I've moved whole drive arrays and Windows coped. Linux usually works too.

They both seem to do a real good job of handling this.

For me, the fly in the ointment in a move is almost always the NIC. On Linux it tends to break all the network config, and on Windows most of the time it doesn't have the driver. Fortunately neither one is that hard to correct.

*Technically those are the same architecture though different types.

Edited 2012-11-27 20:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2