Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Nov 2012 15:17 UTC
Windows "As we pass the one month anniversary of the general availability of Windows 8, we are pleased to announce that to-date Microsoft has sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses. Tami Reller shared this news with industry and financial analysts, investors and media today at the Credit Suisse 2012 Annual Technology Conference. Windows 8 is outpacing Windows 7 in terms of upgrades." Not bad, but there are the usual asterisks, as Ars notes.
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RE: Yeah.
by tylerdurden on Wed 28th Nov 2012 23:40 UTC in reply to "Yeah."
tylerdurden
Member since:
2009-03-17

Why? It does not make a difference, a license is a license. The granularity or location of the sale seems irrelevant, as long as desktop and laptop PCs sell microsoft will sell tons of windows licenses since they have a near monopoly in that space.

My assumption is that windows 8 will do great in the consumer space, the touch screen is a great gimmick and gives OEMs a new "differentiation" to help push people upgrade or buy new systems. I assume business will skip this upgrade cycle, since Metro is useless in most of their applications.

I'm more interested in the Windows Phone and Surface sales. Since those are the areas of biggest growth, and microsoft lacks a monopoly to leverage there.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Yeah.
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 29th Nov 2012 00:53 in reply to "RE: Yeah."
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Why? It does not make a difference, a license is a license. The granularity or location of the sale seems irrelevant, as long as desktop and laptop PCs sell microsoft will sell tons of windows licenses since they have a near monopoly in that space.

A [most likely] forced license with a new PC sale vs. a license that the user willfully purchased. That's the difference, and it's a huge one.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Yeah.
by tylerdurden on Thu 29th Nov 2012 01:19 in reply to "RE[2]: Yeah."
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

It is not a huge difference, it is an attempt to split hairs in order to build whatever argument based on pure appeal to emotion. I.e. nobody is forcing anyone to buy a PC running windows at gun point.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Yeah.
by Bobthearch on Thu 29th Nov 2012 02:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Yeah."
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

A [most likely] forced license with a new PC sale vs. a license that the user willfully purchased. That's the difference, and it's a huge one.


Isn't the same thing true with Windows 7 licenses a couple of years ago and XP licenses way back when?

That's the point, comparing Windows 8 to previous versions. The comparison is no good if different methods are used.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Yeah.
by zima on Sat 1st Dec 2012 12:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Yeah."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

A [most likely] forced license with a new PC sale vs. a license that the user willfully purchased. That's the difference, and it's a huge one.

"Forced"? Keep telling yourself that... People like and want Windows, it's almost certainly pirated more than the number of desktop Linux users.

Nearby you ask "What's the alternative?" WRT "nobody is forcing anyone to buy a PC running windows at gun point" - well... get a laptop without OS, or with Linux.

Visiting "laptops" category of ceneo.pl (possibly the most popular and well-known here catalogue of products and online shops; surely you have similar services...) quite often shows a model without Windows at the top of popularity; and generally, "no OS" & "Linux"* filters give http://www.ceneo.pl/Laptopy;017P8-250094-250095.htm few hundred results. But BTW, most of those machines end up with Windows, anyway (oh, and that's no-crapware-included Windows) - at best a MSDNAA license.


*that's often just a smokescreen of the reputable big PC maker, who can say ~"we don't facilitate piracy, all of our machines are sold with an operating system" or such. Devil is often in the details: in one case I've seen, it was just a Knoppix live-DVD thrown into the box; in another, some Linux installation which didn't and couldn't boot into X, Linux lacked support for the GFX chip in that laptop. Few years ago, one reputable PC maker even sold laptops with "DOS2000"...

Reply Parent Score: 2