Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th Dec 2012 23:09 UTC
Windows So, last night, Windows Phone 8 got its first update - specifically for the HTC 8X. In this day and age, where iOS is the gold standard and shows the industry how it ought to be done, and Android is the exact opposite, Windows Phone 7 was a bit of an in-between - every phone got every update, but the staggered rollout was slow and frustrating, often due to carrier meddling. How will Windows Phone 8 fare?
Thread beginning with comment 544834
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[4]: Nexus Line
by Morgan on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:13 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Nexus Line"
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

The problem with your position is that you lay the blame on Google, or on the Android platform itself, for the delay. Any delay on receiving updates is purely the fault of the carriers, and that will happen, and has happened, irrespective of the platform. It was even worse for BlackBerry owners several years ago; AT&T BB users were left in the cold most of the time when it came to BB OS updates, while Verizon and Sprint users got timely support.

It seems as if you are the one being disingenuous for not acknowledging that.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Nexus Line
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:22 in reply to "RE[4]: Nexus Line"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

It's called the fundamental attribution error. When WP7.8/8 updates are messy, it's due to situational circumstances - when Android updates are messy, it's due to Google.

In the meantime, those of us without any vested interest in any one platform know where the faults lie. For Android, carriers and OEMs. For WP, carriers. Google and Microsoft are not even part of the blame.

Edited 2012-12-12 16:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:40 in reply to "RE[5]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I just don't buy into the fact that the relatively pain free Windows Phone updates are anything in the same ballgame as the shitfuck that is the Android update situation.

Your cited example (the Focus 2) was TERRIBLE. Yet, because you said it, it magically equates Android and Windows Phone, despite it being 100% incorrect. That's bullshit I refuse to buy into.

Now, if you want to talk Windows Phone update issues, I'll talk about then, because there are plenty. But they are for different reasons, and of different degrees of pain for end users.

1) Pre-Mango the NoDo update roll out was terrible. It was however their first update, and since then the process has matured quite a bit.

2) The post-Tango firmware update messaging was a mess, Microsoft refused to comment on the existence of an update for weeks after the OEMs pushed it. By and large though, from the Spring to the Summer, a majority of people got the update.

The only phones that really had an issue, were those who were in development when Tango 2 launched, and launched with Tango 1 instead. ATT and OEMs dragged their foot on it, but I don't think MS particularly pushed hard on the issue either.

3) The messaging behind WP7/WP7.8 is a mess. By and large, this is one of their biggest screw ups. They really messed up by not giving enough information in a timely enough manner.

It remains to be seen how the WP 7.8 roll out will go. However, let's make a bet. Let's wait until January 2013, if the WP7.8 roll out is terrible, and not excellent like the Mango roll out, then I'll concede that the situation on both platforms (Android and WP) are the same.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Nexus Line
by Nelson on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:33 in reply to "RE[4]: Nexus Line"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Because there is a refusal to acknowledge that the situations are not the same.

By and large, every Windows Phone 7 owner has been updated to the latest Windows Phone 7 release.

A majority of Windows Phone users run the latest version of their platform. That is a fact. A majority of WP7 users are on 8773. The same is NOT true for Android.

Obviously, there is something much more out of control going on here, and I find it tragic that you, post after post, refuse to notice, or even acknowledge a difference.

Sure, of course, there is carrier and OEM pigheadedness in the way, but the fault lies squarely with Google in that they have not effectively dealt with the situation.

I refuse to equate the two experiences, because while most Windows Phone users are on 8773, by comparison, almost no one is on Jellybean. A fact.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Nexus Line
by Morgan on Wed 12th Dec 2012 16:38 in reply to "RE[5]: Nexus Line"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I'll give your position some merit when I see 7.8 on my HTC Arrive. Sorry, but it's Windows Phone users who are 100% left in the cold here, by Microsoft.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Nexus Line
by tylerdurden on Wed 12th Dec 2012 21:17 in reply to "RE[5]: Nexus Line"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

You're conveniently limiting Windows Phone to the same release; 8. Yes, technically most Windows Phone users may be on that release, but that is because almost no one bought or is using the previous version. Not because Microsoft has a brilliant method to keep all his users up to date transparently.



The "upgrade" path for the Windows platform is rather torturous; Windows Mobile 6.5, to Windows Phone 7, and then to Windows Phone 8. 3 different incompatible revisions in less than 3 years. While going from a 15% market share, down to 3% in the same period of time. Given that correlation, it seems that Microsoft's update track record is a significant weakness, not strength.

Edited 2012-12-12 21:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3